Welcome to the Surveillance Knowledge Repository

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Kerala is a small state in India, having a population of only 34 million (2011 census) but with excellent health indices, human development index and a worthy model of decentralised governance. Integrated Disease Surveillance Program, a centrally supported surveillance program, in place since... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Disease surveillance systems can be based on two components of surveillance: active surveillance in which the diseases are looked for on a regular basis in a defined population, and passive surveillance where the diseases are looked for whenever specific sanitary events are notified. The first... Read more

Content type: Abstract

The opioid overdose crisis has rapidly expanded in North Carolina (NC), paralleling the epidemic across the United States. The number of opioid overdose deaths in NC has increased by nearly 40% each year since 2015.1 Critical to preventing overdose deaths is increasing access to the life-saving... Read more

Content type: Abstract

In 2016, there were approximately 63,000 deaths nationally due to drug overdose. This trend continues to increase with the provisional number of US deaths for 2017 being approximately 72,000 (1). This increase in overdose deaths is fueled largely by the opioid class of drugs. The opioid epidemic... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Disease mapping is a method used to descript the geographical variation in risk (heterogeneity of risk) and to provide the potential reason (factors or confounders) to explain the distribution. Possibly the most famous uses of disease mapping in epidemiology were the studies by John Snow of the... Read more

Content type: Abstract

The use of new technologies such as Online Maps and the QR Code facilitates the knowledge dissemination in the health science, aiding in diagnostic elucidation and intelligent decisions making, thus offering an improvement in the quality of care provided to patients. Cases with suspected spotted... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Neonatal tetanus (NT) though a preventable disease, remains a disturbing cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality particularly in low income countries where maternal and child care are substandard and antitetanus immunization coverage is still poor. The disease, which is mostly fatal, is... Read more

Content type: Abstract

During an influenza pandemic, when hospitals and doctors'™ offices are or are perceived to be overwhelmed, many ill people may not seek medical care. People may also avoid medical facilities due to fear of contracting influenza or transmitting it to others. Therefore, syndromic methods for... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Chronic diseases impose heavy burdens onhealth systems, economies, andsocieties (1). Half of all Americans live with at least one of the chronic conditions and more than 75% of health care cost is associated with people with chronic diseases (2). Multimorbidity, the coexistence of two ormore... Read more

Content type: Abstract

An interdisciplinary team convened by ISDS to translate public health use-case needs into well-defined technical problems recently identified the need for new pre-syndromic surveillance methods that do not rely on existing syndromes or pre-defined illness categories1. Our group has recently... Read more

Content type: Abstract

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