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The early detection of outbreaks of diseases is one of the most challenging objectives of epidemiological surveillance systems. In order to achieve this goal, the primary foundation is using those big surveillance data for understanding and controlling the spatiotemporal variability of disease... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Syndromic surveillance involves monitoring big health datasets to provide early warning of threats to public health. Public health authorities use statistical detection algorithms to interrogate these datasets for aberrations that are indicative of emerging threats. The algorithm currently in... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Drug overdoses are an increasingly serious problem in the United States and worldwide. The CDC estimates that 47,055 drug overdose deaths occurred in the United States in 2014, 61% of which involved opioids (including heroin, pain relievers such as oxycodone, and synthetics).1 Overdose deaths... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Infectious disease outbreaks, such as the Ebola outbreak in West Africa, highlight the need for surveillance systems to quickly detect outbreaks and provide data to prevent future pandemics. The World Health Organization (WHO) developed the Joint External Evaluation (JEE) tool to conduct country... Read more

Content type: Abstract

The Biosurveillance Ecosystem (BSVE) is a biological and chemical threat surveillance system sponsored by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA). BSVE is intended to be user-friendly, multi-agency, cooperative, modular and threat agnostic platform for biosurveillance [2]. In BSVE, a web-... Read more

Content type: Abstract

An interdisciplinary team convened by ISDS to translate public health use-case needs into well-defined technical problems recently identified the need for new pre-syndromic surveillance methods that do not rely on existing syndromes or pre-defined illness categories1. Our group has recently... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Neill’s fast subset scan2 detects significant spatial patterns of disease by efficiently maximizing a log-likelihood ratio statistic over subsets of locations, but may result in patterns that are not spatially compact. The penalized fast subset scan (PFSS)3 provides a flexible framework for... Read more

Content type: Abstract

The Florida Department of Health (DOH) utilizes the Electronic Surveillance System for the Early Notification of Community Based Epidemics (ESSENCE-FL) as its statewide syndromic surveillance system. ESSENCE-FL comprises of chief complaint data from 231 of 240 EDs, representing 96 percent of the... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Taking into account reporting delays in surveillance systems is not methodologically trivial. Consequently, most use the date of the reception of data, rather than the (often unknown) date of the health event itself. The main drawback of this approach is the resulting reduction in sensitivity... Read more

Content type: Abstract

This report is designed to aid state, territorial, tribal, and local public health leaders as they improve their capacity to achieve situational awareness during a public health emergency. We intend this report to serve as a concise reference work public health leaders can use to help design and... Read more

Content type: Report

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