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Influenza is one of the significant causes of morbidity and mortality globally. Previous studies have demonstrated the benefit of laboratory surveillance and its capability to accurately detect influenza outbreaks earlier than syndromic surveillance.1-3 Current laboratory surveillance has an... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Transmission and amplification of influenza within schools has been purported as a driving mechanism for subsequent outbreaks in surrounding communities. However, the number of studies assessing the utility of monitoring school absenteeism as an indicator of influenza in the community is limited... Read more

Content type: Abstract

To describe the results of the new organization of influenza surveillance in France, based on a regional approach. This regional multi-source approach has been made possible by the sharing of data visualizations and statistical results through a web application. This application helped detecting... Read more

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Public health agencies worldwide all enjoy the same mission—providing healthcare warnings, guidance, and support to the public and healthcare professionals they represent. A critical element in achieving this mission is accessing timely and comprehensive surveillance information about disease... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Since the emergence of avian influenza A(H7N9) virus in 2013, extensive surveillances have been established to monitor the human infection and environmental contamination with avian influenza virus in southern China. At the end of 2015, human infection with influenza A(H5N6) virus was identified... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Influenza infection is caused by the influenza virus, a single-stranded RNA virus belonging to the Orthomyxoviridae family. Influenza viruses are classified as types A, B and C. Influenza A and B viruses can cause epidemic disease in humans and type C viruses usually cause a mild, cold-like... Read more

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Traditionally, public health surveillance departments collect, analyze, interpret, and package information into static surveillance reports for distribution to stakeholders. This resource-intensive production and dissemination process has major shortcomings that impede end users from optimally... Read more

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The motivation for this project is to provide greater situational awareness to DoD epidemiologists monitoring the health of military personnel and their dependents. An increasing number of data sources of varying clinical specificity and timeliness are available to the staff. The challenge is to... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Public Health England (PHE) uses syndromic surveillance systems to monitor for seasonal increases in respiratory illness. Respiratory illnesses create a considerable burden on health care services and therefore identifying the timing and intensity of peaks of activity is important for public... Read more

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The early detection of outbreaks of diseases is one of the most challenging objectives of epidemiological surveillance systems. In order to achieve this goal, the primary foundation is using those big surveillance data for understanding and controlling the spatiotemporal variability of disease... Read more

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