Welcome to the Surveillance Knowledge Repository

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The Minnesota Department of Health (MDH) needs to be able to collect, use, and share clinical, individual-level health data electronically in secure and standardized ways in order to optimize surveillance capabilities, support public health goals, and ensure proper follow-up and action to public... Read more

Content type: Abstract

The advent of Meaningful Use (MU) has allowed for the expansion of data collected at the hospital level and received by public health for syndromic surveillance. The triage note, a free text expansion on the chief complaint, is one of the many variables that are becoming commonplace in syndromic... Read more

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INDICATOR is a multi-stream open source platform for biosurveillance and outbreak detection, currently focused on Champaign County in Illinois[1]. It has been in production since 2008 and is currently receiving data from emergency departments, patient advisory nurse call center, outpatient... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Most outbreaks are small and localized in nature, although it is larger outbreaks that result in the most public attention. So a solution to manage an outbreak has to be able to accommodate a response to small outbreaks in a single jurisdiction scalable up to outbreaks that involve thousands of... Read more

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Multiple agencies are involved in global disease surveillance and coordination of activities is essential to achieve broad public health impact. Multiple examples of effective and collaborative initiatives exist. The WHO/AFRO developed Integrated Disease Surveillance and Response (IDSR)... Read more

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Clinical data captured in electronic health records (EHR) for patient health care could be used for chronic disease surveillance, helping to inform and prioritize interventions at a state or community level. While there has been significant progress in the collection of clinical information such... Read more

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Health care information is a fundamental source of data for biosurveillance, yet configuring EHRs to report relevant data to health departments is technically challenging, labor intensive, and often requires custom solutions for each installation. Public health agencies wishing to deliver alerts... Read more

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The emerging threat of antimicrobial resistant organisms is a pressing public health concern. Surveillance for antimicrobial resistance can prevent infections, protect patients in the healthcare setting and improve antimicrobial use. In 2018, the Utah Department of Health mandated the reporting... Read more

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Healthcare data, including emergency department (ED) and outpatient health visit data, are potentially useful to the public health community for multiple purposes, including programmatic and surveillance activities. These data are collected through several mechanisms, including administrative... Read more

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Whole-genome sequencing of disease-causing organisms provides an unabridged examination of the genetic content of individual pathogen isolates, enabling public health laboratories to benefit from comparative analyses of total genetic content. Combining this information with sample metadata such... Read more

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