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Healthcare data, including emergency department (ED) and outpatient health visit data, are potentially useful to the public health community for multiple purposes, including programmatic and surveillance activities. These data are collected through several mechanisms, including administrative... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Electronic disease surveillance canonically represents analysis performed on health records with respect to their syndromes, complaints, lab data, etc. This data can tell the story of a patient’s current status but does not provide a holistic look at the where the patient is from. By... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Integration of information from multiple disparate and heterogeneous sources is a labor and resource intensive task. Heterogeneity can come about in the way data is represented or in the meaning of data in different contexts. Semantic Web technologies have been proposed to address both... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Group A Streptococcal (GAS) pharyngitis, the most common bacterial cause of acute pharyngitis, causes more than half a billion cases annually worldwide. Treatment with antibiotics provides symptomatic benefit and reduces complications, missed work days and transmission. Physical examination ... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Oregon Public Health Division (OPHD), in collaboration with the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, implemented Oregon ESSENCE in 2012. Oregon ESSENCE is an automated, electronic syndromic surveillance system that captures emergency department data. To strengthen the... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in the U.S. with radon exposure as the second leading cause of lung cancer after smoking and the number one cause of lung cancer among nonsmokers. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) estimates that one in fifteen homes nationwide has... Read more

Content type: Abstract

This presentation introduces the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) National Bio-Surveillance Integration System (NBIS) and the analytics functionality within the NBIS that integrates and analyzes structured and unstructured data streams across domains to provide inter-agency analysts... Read more

Content type: Abstract

The Office of the Medical Examiner (OME) is a statewide system for investigation of sudden and unexpected death in Utah. OME, in the Utah Department of Health (UDOH), certified over 2000 of the 13,920 deaths in Utah in 2008.

Information from OME death investigations is currently stored in... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Most countries do not report national notifiable disease data in a machine-readable format. Data are often in the form of a file that contains text, tables and graphs summarizing weekly or monthly disease counts. This presents a problem when information is needed for more data intensive... Read more

Content type: Abstract

The multiple forms of Human African Trypanosomiasis (human T.b. gambiense and zoonotic T.b. rhodesiense, as well as the several strains which cause disease in animals) that occur in Uganda make coordinating the scientific and developmental, human and animal, social and economic systems... Read more

Content type: Case Study

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