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EpiCore draws on the knowledge of a global community of human, animal, and environmental health professionals to verify information on disease outbreaks in their geographic regions. By using innovative surveillance techniques and crowdsourcing these experts, EpiCore enables faster global... Read more

Content type: Abstract

ARIs have epidemic and pandemic potential. Prediction of presence of ARIs from individual signs and symptoms in existing studies have been based on clinically-sourced data. Clinical data generally represents the most severe cases, and those from locations with access to healthcare institutions.... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Georgia Department of Public Health (DPH) epidemiologists have responded to multiple emergent outbreaks with diverse surveillance needs. During the 2009 H1N1 influenza response, it was necessary to electronically integrate multiple reporting sources and view population-level data, while during... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Objective

Wisconsin is leading the way in novel approaches monitoring health outcomes for opioid-related adverse events. This panel will share innovative public health informatics methods that harness various data sources (e.g., Prescription Drug Monitoring Data (PDMP), death, birth and... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Pakistan being a subtropical region is highly susceptible to water-borne, air-borne and vector-borne infectious diseases (IDs). Each year, millions of its people are exposed to, and infected with, deadly pathogens including hepatitis, tuberculosis, malaria, and now-a-days dengue fever (DF).... Read more

Content type: Case Study

Vector borne diseases like Japanese Encephalitis (JE) result from the convergence of multiple factors, including, but not limited to, human, animal, environmental, and economic and social determinants. Thus, to combat these problems, it is essential to have a systematic understanding of drivers... Read more

Content type: Case Study

The multiple forms of Human African Trypanosomiasis (human T.b. gambiense and zoonotic T.b. rhodesiense, as well as the several strains which cause disease in animals) that occur in Uganda make coordinating the scientific and developmental, human and animal, social and economic systems... Read more

Content type: Case Study

Cyanobacteria and marine algae are ubiquitous in the earth's freshwaters and oceans. Under the right circumstances, these organisms can proliferate, causing harmful algal blooms (HABs) which may produce toxins that threaten human and animal health as well as local and regional ecology. Animals... Read more

Content type: Case Study

The Oregon ESSENCE team has developed a guide for other states to use to set up a web service link to their poison center and extract its data into ESSENCE. It contains advice based on Oregon’s experience in developing its link with its poison center and NDPS, a plug-&-play (almost) Rhapsody... Read more

Content type: References

The National Syndromic Surveillance Program (NSSP) conducted a three-part webinar series in 2016 to describe how data would flow to the BioSense Platform. This comprehensive series explored how data were to be ingested into the BioSense Platform and ESSENCE application and how BioSense 2.0 data... Read more

Content type: Surveillance Tools and Systems

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