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The mission of Overdose Surveillance Committee (ODSC) group is to organize and connect community members who are interested in overdose surveillance to discuss various issues concerning to this topic.

To learn more about the committee and participate in its activities, join the bimonthly... Read more

Content type: Meeting Recordings & Notes

West Virginia continues to lead the nation in drug overdose deaths per capita. In 2016, the age-adjusted rate of drug overdose deaths was 52 per 100,0001. In the same year, there were roughly 64,000 overdose deaths in the United States, a 21.5% rate increase from 20151. The drug overdose... Read more

Content type: Abstract

These slides were presented at the Enhanced State Opioid Overdose Surveillance (ESOOS) Program Overview Partner meeting, led by CDC and organized by ASTHO in March of 2019. 

Presenters

Puja Seth, PhD – Lead, Epidemiology and Surveillance

Alana Vivolo-Kantor, PhD – Morbidity... Read more

Content type: Presentation Slides

Drug overdoses are now the leading cause of accidental death in the United States, with an estimated 60,000 deaths in 2016. Nationally, EMS overdose responses with naloxone administration have nearly doubled from 2012 to 2016 from 573.6 to 1004.4 per 100,000 EMS events. Resuscitation using the... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Drug overdose deaths are increasing nationally and in Minnesota (MN). This is only a fraction of the overall burden that recreational drug use exacts on emergency departments (ED) and hospitals. In addition to opioids and other drugs, three outbreaks of synthetic cannabinoids and cathinones have... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Timely and accurate measurement of overdose morbidity using emergency department (ED) data is necessary to inform an effective public health response given the dynamic nature of opioid overdose epidemic in the United States. However, from jurisdiction to jurisdiction, differing sources and types... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Black Hoosiers, the largest minority population in Indiana, make up almost 10% of the state's population, and accounted for 8% of the total resident drug overdose deaths from 2013-2017 compared to whites at 91%. However, a closer look at race-specific mortality rates might reveal racial... Read more

Content type: Abstract

As a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Enhanced State Opioid Overdose Surveillance (ESOOS) funded state, Kentucky started utilizing Emergency Medical Services (EMS) data to increase timeliness of state data on drug overdose events in late 2016. Using developed definitions of heroin... Read more

Content type: Abstract

The opioid epidemic is a multifaceted public health issue that requires a coordinated and dynamic response to address the ongoing changes in the trends of opioid overdoses. Access to timely and accurate data allows more targeted and effective programs and policies to prevent and reduce fatal and... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Since 2008, drug overdose deaths exceeded the number of motor vehicle traffic-related deaths in Indiana, and the gap continues to widen1. While federal funding opportunities are available for states, it often takes years for best practices to be developed, shared, and published. Similarly, local... Read more

Content type: Abstract

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