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Presented May 16, 2019.

After the major impact of the 2003 heat wave, France needed a reactive, permanent and national surveillance system enabling to detect and to follow-up various public health events all over the territory including overseas. In June 2004, the French syndromic... Read more

Content type: Webinar

An Online Training Course

Ever wonder what syndromic surveillance is? How it is applied? This introduction to syndromic surveillance answers your questions and gives you a foundation for understanding how surveillance is used by public health professionals to understand health threats.... Read more

Content type: Training

The 2016 U.S. Olympic Track and Field Team Trials were held July 1-10 in Eugene, OR. This mass gathering included over 1,000 athletes, 1,500 volunteers, and 175,000 spectators. The Oregon Public Health Division (PHD) and Lane County Public Health (LCPH) participated in pre-event planning and... Read more

Content type: Abstract

In 2012, the Oregon Public Health Division (OPHD) took advantage of the opportunity created by Meaningful Use, a Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) Incentive Program, to implement statewide syndromic surveillance. The Oregon syndromic surveillance project, or Oregon ESSENCE,... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Fifteen years have passed since the Public Health Security and Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response Act of 2002 called for the establishment of nationwide surveillance and reporting mechanisms to detect bioterrorism-related events. In the 1990s, several health departments established... Read more

Content type: Journal Article

Syndromic surveillance uses near-real-time emergency department and other health care data for enhancing public health situational awareness and informing public health activities. In recent years, continued progress has been made in developing and strengthening syndromic surveillance activities... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Overdose deaths involving opioids (i.e., opioid pain relievers and illicit opioids such as heroin) accounted for at least 63% (N = 33,091) of overdose deaths in 2015. Overdose deaths related to illicit opioids, heroin and illicitly-manufactured fentanyl, have rapidly increased since 2010. For... Read more

Content type: Abstract

In 2015, suicide was the 8th leading cause of death in Salt Lake County, Utah, and has recently been identified as a priority public health issue. For suicide, suicide ideation and suicide attempts surveillance, Salt Lake County Health Department staff use National Violent Death Reporting System... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Syndromic data is shifting the way surveillance has been done traditionally. Most recently, surveillance has gone beyond city limits and county boundary lines. In southeast Texas, a regional consortium of public health agencies and stakeholders in the 13-County area governs the local ESSENCE... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Syndromic surveillance data is typically used for the monitoring of symptom combinations in patient chief complaints (i.e. syndromes) or health indicators within a population to inform public health actions. The Tennessee Department of Health collects emergency department (ED) data from more... Read more

Content type: Abstract

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