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Syndromic surveillance aims to decrease the time to detection of an outbreak compared to traditional surveillance methods. Emergency department (ED) syndromic surveillance systems vary in their methodology and complexity and are usually based on presenting chief complaints. Prior work in ED-... Read more

Content type: Abstract

In the fall of 2001, the Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response (BT P&R) Unit initiated a syndromic surveillance system utilizing chief complaint data collected from Emergency Departments throughout Los Angeles County (LAC). Chief complaint data were organized into four syndromes (... Read more

Content type: Abstract

The CC text field is a rich source of information, but its current use for syndromic surveillance is limited to a fixed set of syndromes that are routine, suspected, expected, or discovered by chance. In addition to syndromes that are routinely monitored by the NYC Department of Health and... Read more

Content type: Abstract

The Florida Department of Health (FDOH) previously monitored Florida Poison Information Center (FPICN) data for timely detection of increases in carbon monoxide (CO) exposures before, during, and after hurricanes. Recent analyses have noted that CO poisonings have also increased with generator... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Objective To examine sub-syndrome distributions among BioSense emergency department (ED) chief complaint and final diagnosis based data and to observe patterns by hospital system, age, and gender.

Content type: Abstract

Previously we used an “N-Gram” classifier for syndromic surveillance of emergency department (ED) chief complaints (CC) in English for bioterrorism. The classifier is trained on a set of ED visits for which both the ICD diagnosis code and CC are available by measuring the associations of text... Read more

Content type: Abstract

The Electronic Surveillance System for the Early Notification of Community-based Epidemics in Florida (ESSENCE-FL) is a web-based application for use by public health professionals within the Florida Department of Health (FDOH). The main source of data for ESSENCE-FL is emergency department (ED... Read more

Content type: Abstract

The Florida Department of Health (FDOH) previously monitored Florida Poison Information Center (FPICN) data for timely detection of increases in carbon monoxide (CO) exposures before, during, and after hurricanes. Recent analyses have noted that CO poisonings have also increased with generator... Read more

Content type: Abstract

The number of US adults who use the internet to access health information has increased from about 95 million in 2005 to 220 million in 2014. The public health impact of this trend is unknown; in theory, patients may be able to better help the doctor arrive at the correct diagnosis, but self-... Read more

Content type: Abstract

The existing New York State Department of Health emergency department syndromic surveillance system has used patient’s chief complaint (CC) for assigning to six syndrome categories (Respiratory, Fever, Gastrointestinal, Neurological, Rash, Asthma). The sensitivity and specificity of the CC... Read more

Content type: Abstract

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