Welcome to the Surveillance Knowledge Repository

Click on a topic under the Key Topic Areas section in the left column, then select a resource  from the list of resources that appear for that topic. You may also search for specific topics by entering one or more keywords in the Search bar. You can filter the search results by Content Type, Year, or Author Name.

Submit

Key Topic Areas

Author Name

Tags

Reset filters

Poliomyelitis a disease targeted for eradication since 1988 still pose public health challenge. The Eastern Mediterranean and African Regions out of the six World Health Organization (WHO) Regions are yet to be certified polio free. The certification of the WHO Africa region is largely dependent... Read more

Content type: Abstract

In the early morning of Friday January 20, 2017, Toronto Public Health (TPH) was notified of several reports of acute vomiting, diarrhea, and stomach pain/cramps among students living in residence at a post-secondary institution in Toronto, Canada. A public health investigation was initiated and... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Monitoring of long-term infectious disease mortality trends is of great value to national public health systems both in estimation of the efficacy of preventive programs, and in development of the new strategies of preventive measures. In the developed countries, there are a number of studies... Read more

Content type: Abstract

To immediately monitor disease outbreaks, the application of laboratory-based surveillance is more popular in recent years. Taiwan Centers for Disease Control (TCDC) has developed LARS to collect the laboratory-confirmed cases caused by any of 20 pathogens daily via automated submitting of... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Public health agencies worldwide all enjoy the same mission—providing healthcare warnings, guidance, and support to the public and healthcare professionals they represent. A critical element in achieving this mission is accessing timely and comprehensive surveillance information about disease... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Syndromic surveillance data is typically used for the monitoring of symptom combinations in patient chief complaints (i.e. syndromes) or health indicators within a population to inform public health actions. The Tennessee Department of Health collects emergency department (ED) data from more... Read more

Content type: Abstract

As part of this surveillance study for Avian Influenza both active and passive surveillance samples were tested using PCR and also utilized to validate the LAMP method. Active surveillance samples include pathological material and tracheal and cloacal swabs from ill poultry, which were... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Global Mass gatherings (MGs) such as Olympic Games, FIFA World Cup, and Hajj (Muslim pilgrimage to Makkah), attract millions of people from different countries. The gathering of a large population in a proximity facilitates transmission of infectious diseases. Attendees arrive from different... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Sequence-informed surveillance is now recognized as an important extension to the monitoring of rapidly evolving pathogens [2]. This includes phylogeography, a field that studies the geographical lineages of species including viruses [3] by using sequence data (and relevant metadata such as... Read more

Content type: Abstract

This report is designed to aid state, territorial, tribal, and local public health leaders as they improve their capacity to achieve situational awareness during a public health emergency. We intend this report to serve as a concise reference work public health leaders can use to help design and... Read more

Content type: Report

Pages

Didn't find what you're looking for? Then try searching our archives.

Contact Us

NSSP Community of Practice

Email: syndromic@cste.org

 

This website is supported by Cooperative Agreement # 6NU38OT000297-02-01 Strengthening Public Health Systems and Services through National Partnerships to Improve and Protect the Nation's Health between the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists. Its contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of CDC. CDC is not responsible for Section 508 compliance (accessibility) on private websites.

Site created by Fusani Applications