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ARIs have epidemic and pandemic potential. Prediction of presence of ARIs from individual signs and symptoms in existing studies have been based on clinically-sourced data. Clinical data generally represents the most severe cases, and those from locations with access to healthcare institutions.... Read more

Content type: Abstract

A significant amount of resources and effort have been recently invested in syndromic surveillance systems. However, how these systems complement or compare with traditional public health surveillance systems, such as outbreak reporting, is not clear.  

Objective:

The purpose of... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Previously we developed an “Ngram” classifier for syndromic surveillance of emergency department (ED) chief complaints (CC) in Turkish for bioterrorism. The classifier is developed from a set of ED visits for which both the ICD diagnosis code and CC are available. A computer program calculates... Read more

Content type: Abstract

This project was established through the Border Infectious Disease Surveillance (BIDS) program in Arizona (AZ) to monitor infecting respiratory pathogens among hospitalized patients with Severe Acute Respiratory Infections (SARI) in the AZ border region from September 2010 to the present.

... Read more
Content type: Abstract

Assigning causes of deaths to seasonal infectious diseases is difficult in part due to laboratory testing prior to death being uncommon. Since influenza (and other common respiratory pathogens) are therefore notoriously underreported as a (contributing) cause of death in deathcause statistics... Read more

Content type: Abstract

The prompt detection of disease outbreaks is a major concern to public health as it has the potential to reduce morbidity and mortality (1). Real-time syndromic surveillance uses existing non-traditional data for timely analysis and feedback to those responsible for investigations and follow-up... Read more

Content type: Abstract

It has been noted since the era of Hippocrates that weather conditions at a specific location can influence the incidence of various infectious and noninfectious diseases. It has also been implied that variations in weather conditions influence the number of cases of infectious respiratory... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Calls to NHS Direct (a national UK telephone health advice line) which may be indicative of infection show marked seasonal variation, often peaking during winter or early spring. This variation may be related to the seasonality of common viruses. There is currently no routine microbiological... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Seasonal rises in respiratory illnesses are a major burden on primary care services. Public Health England (PHE), in collaboration with NHS 111, coordinate a national surveillance system based upon the daily calls received at the NHS 111 telehealth service. Daily calls are categorized according... Read more

Content type: Abstract

To measure the impact, within administrative geographic areas, of household income on rates of visits due influenza and RSV among children using real-time syndromic surveillance.

Content type: Abstract

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