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Rabies is a zoonotic, neglected viral disease. Every 10 minutes, the world loses a life, especially children, to dog-mediated rabies. Yet it is 100% preventable. Africa, including Nigeria, has major share of the disease. Eradication of human rabies relies majorly on control of rabies in animals... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Communicable disease reporting from providers can be a time-consuming process that results in delayed or incomplete reporting of infectious diseases, limiting public health's ability to respond quickly to prevent or control disease. The recent development of an HL7 standard for automated... Read more

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Mortality is an indicator of the severity of the impact of an event on the population. In France mortality surveillance is part of the syndromic surveillance system SurSaUD and is carried out by Santé publique France, the French public health agency. The set-up of an Electronic Death... Read more

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Since 2015, CDC’s Division of Health Informatics and Surveillance staff have conducted evaluations to provide information on the utility, functionality, usability and user satisfaction associated with the National Syndromic Surveillance Program’s BioSense Platform tools. The BioSense... Read more

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PHIN-MS can send and receive data securely and automatically. It is used by many hospitals in the state(s) to send data to the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SC DHEC) for both our National Electronic Disease Surveillance System and our South Carolina Early... Read more

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Timely identification of arboviral disease is key to prevent transmission in the community, but traditional surveillance may take up to 14 days between specimen collection and health department notification. Arizona state and county health agencies began monitoring National Syndromic... Read more

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Syndromic surveillance uses near-real-time Emergency Department healthcare and other data to improve situational awareness and inform activities implemented in response to public health concerns. The National Syndromic Surveillance Program (NSSP) is a collaboration among state and local health... Read more

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In January 2017, the NSSP transitioned their BioSense analytical tools to Electronic Surveillance System for Early Notification of Community-Based Epidemics (ESSENCE). The chief complaint field in BioSense 2.0 was a concatenation of the record's chief complaint, admission reason, triage notes,... Read more

Content type: Abstract

In 2005, the Cook County Department of Public Health (CCDPH) began using the Electronic Surveillance System for the Early Notification of Community-based Epidemics (ESSENCE) as an emergency department (ED)-based local syndromic surveillance program (LSSP); 23 (100%) of 23 hospitals in suburban... Read more

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Pilot projects help determine utility and feasibility of a system, but even if considered successful, cost could prevent further scale-up. When evaluating a surveillance system pilot, cost and benefits are key factors to examine. In Cote d’Ivoire and Tanzania, Ministry of Health (MoH) and non-... Read more

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