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Per a frequently asked questions document on the ISDS website, approximately two thirds of HL7 records received in BioSense do not provide a Visit ID. As a result, BioSense data processing rules use the patient ID, facility ID and earliest date in the record to identify a unique visit. If the... Read more

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Typical approaches to monitoring ED data classify cases into pre-defined syndromes and then monitor syndrome counts for anomalies. However, syndromes cannot be created to identify every possible cluster of cases of relevance to public health. To address this limitation, NC DETECT’s approach... Read more

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Syndromic surveillance systems offer richer understanding of population health. However, because of their complexity, they are less used at small public health agencies, such as many local health departments (LHDs). The evolution of these systems has included modifying user interfaces for more... Read more

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North Carolina hosted the 2012 Democratic National Convention, September 3-6, 2012. The NC Epidemiology and Surveillance Team was created to facilitate enhanced surveillance for injuries and illnesses, early detection of outbreaks during the DNC, assist local public health with epidemiologic... Read more

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The UNC Department of Emergency Medicine (UNC DEM) conducted an online survey to better understand the surveillance needs of Infection Control Practitioners (ICPs) in North Carolina and solicit feedback on the utility of the North Carolina Disease Event Tracking and Epidemiologic Collection Tool... Read more

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The North Carolina Disease Event Tracking and Epidemiologic Collection Tool (NC DETECT) is the early event detection system that serves public health users across North Carolina. One important data source for this system is North Carolina emergency department visits. ED data from hospitals... Read more

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While early event detection systems aim to detect disease outbreaks before traditional means, following up on the many alerts generated by these systems can be time-consuming and a drain on limited resources.

Authorized users at local, regional and state levels in North Carolina rely on... Read more

Content type: Abstract

The North Carolina Disease Event Tracking and Epidemiologic Collection Tool (NC DETECT) provides early event detection and public health situational awareness to hospital-based and public health users statewide. Authorized users are currently able to view data from emergency departments (n=110... Read more

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Animal bites may have potentially devastating consequences, including physical and emotional trauma, infection, rabies exposure, hospitalization, and, rarely, death. NC law requires animal bites be reported to local health directors. However, methods for recording and storing bite data vary... Read more

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NC DETECT provides near-real-time statewide surveillance capacity to local, regional and state level users across NC with twice daily data feeds from 117 (99%) emergency departments (EDs), hourly updates from the statewide poison center, and daily feeds from statewide EMS runs and select urgent... Read more

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