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Presented May 16, 2019.

After the major impact of the 2003 heat wave, France needed a reactive, permanent and national surveillance system enabling to detect and to follow-up various public health events all over the territory including overseas. In June 2004, the French syndromic... Read more

Content type: Webinar

Syndromic surveillance data is typically used for the monitoring of symptom combinations in patient chief complaints (i.e. syndromes) or health indicators within a population to inform public health actions. The Tennessee Department of Health collects emergency department (ED) data from more... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Mental health is a common and costly concern; it is estimated that nearly 20 percent of adults in the United States live with a mental illness [1] and that more money is spent on mental illness than any other medical condition [2]. One spillover effect of unmet mental health needs may be... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Surveillance of severe influenza infections is lacking in the Netherlands. Ambulance dispatch (AD) data may provide information about severity of the influenza epidemic and its burden on emergency services. The current gold standard, primary care-based surveillance of influenza-like-illness (ILI... Read more

Content type: Abstract

The number of unintentional overdose deaths in New York City (NYC) has increased for seven consecutive years. In 2017, there were 1,487 unintentional drug overdose deaths in NYC. Over 80% of these deaths involved an opioid, including heroin, fentanyl, and prescription pain relievers.1 As part of... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Tanzania adopted IDSR as the platform for all disease surveillance activities. Today, Tanzania's IDSR guidelines include surveillance and response protocols for 34 diseases and conditions of public health importance, outlining in detail necessary recording and reporting procedures and activities... Read more

Content type: Abstract

In 2002, the United States (US) Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) launched the National Environmental Public Health Tracking Program (Tracking Program) to address the challenges and gaps in the nation'™s environmental health surveillance infrastructure. The Tracking Program's... Read more

Content type: Abstract

In December 2009, Taiwan’s CDC stopped its sentinel physician surveillance system. Currently, infectious disease surveillance systems in Taiwan rely on not only the national notifiable disease surveillance system but also real-time outbreak and disease surveillance (RODS) from emergency... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Kerala is a small state in India, having a population of only 34 million (2011 census) but with excellent health indices, human development index and a worthy model of decentralised governance. Integrated Disease Surveillance Program, a centrally supported surveillance program, in place since... Read more

Content type: Abstract

During an influenza pandemic, when hospitals and doctors'™ offices are or are perceived to be overwhelmed, many ill people may not seek medical care. People may also avoid medical facilities due to fear of contracting influenza or transmitting it to others. Therefore, syndromic methods for... Read more

Content type: Abstract

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