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The impact of poor air quality (AQ) on human health is a global issue, with periods of poor AQ known to occur in multiple locations, across different countries at, or around the same time. The Public Health England (PHE) Emergency Department Syndromic Surveillance System (EDSSS) is a public... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Wetter and stormier weather is predicted in the UK as global temperatures rise. It is likely there will be increases in river and coastal flooding. The known short and medium term health effects of flooding are drowning, injury, acute asthma, skin rashes and outbreaks of gastrointestinal and... Read more

Content type: Abstract

When monitoring public health incidents using syndromic surveillance systems, Public Health England (PHE) uses the age of the presenting patient as a key indicator to further assess the severity, impact of the incident, and to provide intelligence on the likely cause. However the age... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Air pollution is well documented to cause adverse health effects in the population. Epidemiological/toxicological studies have demonstrated that air pollution is associated with various adverse health outcomes, ranging from mortality to subclinical respiratory symptoms. Classical epidemiological... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Emergency medicine is a recognized specialty in the United Kingdom (UK), with formal training and accreditation conducted and governed by the Royal College of Emergency Medicine. Health care in the UK is publicly funded and provided by the National Health Service (NHS) through a residence-based... Read more

Content type: Journal Article

Calls to NHS Direct (a national UK telephone health advice line) which may be indicative of infection show marked seasonal variation, often peaking during winter or early spring. This variation may be related to the seasonality of common viruses. There is currently no routine microbiological... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Real-time syndromic surveillance requires daily surveillance of a range of health data sources. Most real-time data sources from health care systems exhibit large day of the week fluctuations as service provision and patient behaviour varies by day of the week. Regular day of the week effects... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Co-financed by the European Commission through the Executive Agency for Health and Consumers, the European Triple-S project (Syndromic Surveillance Survey, Assessment towards Guidelines for Europe) was launched in 2010 for a 3-year period [1]. It involves 24 organisations from 13 countries. The... Read more

Content type: Abstract

While results from syndromic surveillance systems are commonly presented in the literature, few systems appear to have been thoroughly evaluated to examine which events can and cannot be detected, the time to detection and the efficacy of different syndromic surveillance data streams. Such an... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Syndromic surveillance systems often produce large numbers of detections due to excess activity (alarms) in their indicators. Few alarms are classified as alerts (public health events that may require a response). Decision-making in syndromic surveillance as to whether an alarm requires a... Read more

Content type: Abstract

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