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Effective anomaly detection depends on the timely, asynchronous generation of anomalies from multiple data streams using multiple algorithms. Our objective is to describe the use of a case manager tool for combining anomalies into cases, and for collaborative investigation and disposition of... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Objective

Several authors have described ways to introduce artificial outbreaks into time series for the purpose of developing, testing, and evaluating the effectiveness and timeliness of anomaly detection algorithms, and more generally, early event detection systems. While the... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Ideal anomaly detection algorithms shoulddetect both sudden and gradual changes, while keeping the background false positive alert rate at a tolerable level. The algorithms should also be easy to use. Our objective was to develop an anomaly detection algorithm that adapts to the time series... Read more

Content type: Abstract

 

Syndromic surveillance of emergency department(ED) visit data is often based on computerized classifiers which assign patient chief complaints (CC) tosyndromes. These classifiers may need to be updatedperiodically to account for changes over time in the way the CC is recorded or because... Read more

Content type: Abstract

A number of different methods are currently used to classify patients into syndromic groups based on the patient’s chief complaint (CC). We previously reported results using an “Ngram” text processing program for building classifiers (adapted from business research technology at AT&T Labs).... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Ideal anomaly detection algorithms should detect both sudden and gradual changes, while keeping the background false positive alert rate at a tolerable level. Further, the algorithm needs to perform well when the need is to detect small outbreaks in low-incidence diseases. For example, when... Read more

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Previously we developed an “Ngram” classifier for syndromic surveillance of emergency department (ED) chief complaints (CC) in Turkish for bioterrorism. The classifier is developed from a set of ED visits for which both the ICD diagnosis code and CC are available. A computer program calculates... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Previously we used an “N-Gram” classifier for syndromic surveillance of emergency department (ED) chief complaints (CC) in English for bioterrorism. The classifier is trained on a set of ED visits for which both the ICD diagnosis code and CC are available by measuring the associations of text... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Syndromic surveillance of emergency department (ED) visit data is often based on computer algorithms which assign patient chief complaints (CC) to syndromes. ICD9 code data may also be used to develop visit classifiers for syndromic surveillance but the ICD9 code is generally not available... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Syndromic surveillance of emergency department (ED) visit data is often based on computer algorithms which assign patient chief complaints (CC) and ICD code data to syndromes. The triage nurse note (NN) has also been used for surveillance. Previously we developed an “NGram” classifier for... Read more

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