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Clinical data captured in electronic health records (EHR) for patient health care could be used for chronic disease surveillance, helping to inform and prioritize interventions at a state or community level. While there has been significant progress in the collection of clinical information such... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Cross-jurisdictional sharing of public health syndrome data is useful for many reasons, among them to provide a larger regional or national view of activity and to determine if unusual activity observed in one jurisdiction is atypical. Considerable barriers to sharing of public health data exist... Read more

Content type: Abstract

This year’s conference theme is “Harnessing Data to Advance Health Equity” – and Washington State researchers and practitioners at the university, state, and local levels are leading the way in especially novel approaches to visualize health inequity and the effective translation of evidence... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Epidemic acute gastroenteritis (AGE) is a major contributor to the global burden of morbidity and mortality. Rotavirus and norovirus epidemics present a significant burden annually, with their predominant impact in temperate climates occurring during winter periods. Annually, epidemic rotavirus... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Public health departments need enhanced surveillance tools for population monitoring, and external researchers have expertise and methods to provide these tools. However, collaboration with potential solution developers and students in academia, industry, and government has not been sufficiently... Read more

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Syndromic surveillance systems use electronic health-related data to support near-real time disease surveillance. Over the last 10 years, the use of ILI syndromes defined from emergency department (ED) data has become an increasingly accepted strategy for public health influenza surveillance at... Read more

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The International Society for Disease Surveillance (ISDS) will hold its thirteenth annual conference in Philadelphia on December 10th and 11th, 2014.  The society’s mission is to improve population health by advancing the science and practice of disease surveillance, and the annual conference... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Cost-effective, flexible and innovative tools that integrate disparate data sets and allow sharing of information between geographically dispersed collaborators are needed to improve public health surveillance practice. Gossamer Health (Good Open Standards System for Aggregating, Monitoring and... Read more

Content type: Abstract

There is growing recognition that an inability to access timely health indicators can hamper both the design and the effective implementation of infectious diseases control interventions. In malaria control, the global use of standard interventions has driven down the burden of disease in many... Read more

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The Distribute project began in 2006 as a distributed, syndromic surveillance demonstration project that networked state and local health departments to share aggregate emergency department-based influenza-like illness (ILI) syndrome data. Preliminary work found that local systems often applied... Read more

Content type: Abstract

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