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North Carolina hosted the 2018 FEI WEG in Polk County at the Tryon Equestrian Center in September 2018. Polk County, located in the Mountain region of Western North Carolina, is home to 20,357 people, and the population is widely distributed. Event organizers expected approximately 300,000 to... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Materials associated with the Analytic Solutions for Real-Time Biosurveillance: Negation Processing in Free Text Emergency Department Data for Public Health Surveillance consultancy held January 19-20, 2017 at the University of Utah, Salt Lake City.

Problem Summary

False positive... Read more

Content type: Use Case

Recreational drug use is a major problem in the United States and around the world. Specifically, drug abuse results in heavy use of emergency department (ED) services, and is a high financial burden to society and to the hospitals due to chronic ill health and multiple injection drug use... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Fifteen years have passed since the Public Health Security and Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response Act of 2002 called for the establishment of nationwide surveillance and reporting mechanisms to detect bioterrorism-related events. In the 1990s, several health departments established... Read more

Content type: Journal Article

Violence-related injuries are a major source of morbidity and mortality in NC. From 2005-2014, suicide and homicide ranked as NC's 11th and 16th causes of death, respectively. In 2014, there were 1,932 total violent deaths, of which 1,303 were due to suicide (67%), 536 due to homicide (28%), and... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Falls are a leading cause of fatal and nonfatal injury in NC. As the size of the older adult population is predicted to increase over the next few decades, it is likely that the incidence of falls-related morbidity and mortality will increase in tandem. In order to address this public health... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Presented December 6, 2016

Amy Ising presented these slides during the ISDS Pre-Conference Workshop as part of the 2016 ISDS Annual Conference in Atlanta, Georgia. This presentation provices an introduction to Syndromic Surveillance, an overview of key data elements involved in the... Read more

Content type: Presentation Slides

Despite considerable effort since the turn of the century to develop Natural Language Processing (NLP) methods and tools for detecting negated terms in chief complaints, few standardised methods have emerged. Those methods that have emerged (e.g. the NegEx algorithm) are confined to local... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Over the last few decades, the United States has made considerable progress in decreasing the incidence of motor vehicle occupants injured and killed in traffic collisions.1 However, there is still a need for continued motor vehicle crash (MVC) injury surveillance, particularly for vulnerable... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Suicide is a leading cause of mortality in the United States, causing about 45,000 deaths annually. Research suggests that universal screening in health care settings may be beneficial for prevention, but few studies have combined detailed suicide circumstances with ED encounter data to better... Read more

Content type: Abstract

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