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We describe age- and syndrome-specific emergency department (ED) visit patterns for diarrhea and vomiting associated with periods of confirmed epidemic rotavirus and presumed epidemic norovirus in New York City (NYC).

Content type: Abstract

Syndromic surveillance systems were designed for early outbreak and bioterrorism event detection. As practical experience shaped development and implementation, these systems became more broadly used for general surveillance and situational awareness, notably influenza-like illness (ILI)... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Presenters

Marc Paladini, MPH, U.S. Department of Transportation

Catherine Cairns

Julia Gunn, MPH, RN, Boston Public Health Commission

Francisco Averhoff, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Shuying Shen

Atar Baer, Public Health - Seattle and King... Read more

Content type: Webinar

The New York City (NYC) Department of Health and Mental Hygiene monitors visits daily from 49 of 54 NYC emergency departments (EDs), capturing 95% of all ED visits. ED visits for influenza-like illness (ILI) have reflected influenza activity in NYC, better than the more broadly defined fever/flu... Read more

Content type: Abstract

On May 28th, 2009, the ISDS Research and Public Health Practice Committees hosted a joint panel with the goal of bringing current challenges faced by public health practitioners to the attention of the research community at large. Members of both Committees expressed concern that much current... Read more

Content type: Webinar

The Distribute project began in 2006 as a distributed, syndromic surveillance demonstration project that networked state and local health departments to share aggregate emergency department-based influenza-like illness (ILI) syndrome data. Preliminary work found that local systems often applied... Read more

Content type: Abstract

A decade ago, the primary objective of syndromic surveillance was bioterrorism and outbreak early event detection (EED. Syndromic systems for EED focused on rapid, automated data collection, processing and statistical anomaly detection of indicators of potential bioterrorism or outbreak events.... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Data-driven decision-making is a cornerstone of public health emergency response; therefore, a highly-configurable and rapidly deployable data capture system with built-in quality assurance (QA; e.g., completeness, standardization) is critical. Additionally, to keep key stakeholders informed of... Read more

Content type: Abstract

The New York City (NYC) Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DOHMH) receives daily ED data from 49 of NYC’s 52 hospitals, representing approximately 95% of ED visits citywide. Chief complaint (CC) is categorized into syndrome groupings using text recognition of symptom key-words and phrases... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Previous reports have demonstrated the media’s influence on emergency departments (ED) visits in situations such as dramatized acetaminophen overdose, media report of celebrity suicides, television public announcements for early stroke care and cardiac visits following President Clinton’s heart... Read more

Content type: Abstract

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