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Public Health England (PHE) uses syndromic surveillance systems to monitor for seasonal increases in respiratory illness. Respiratory illnesses create a considerable burden on health care services and therefore identifying the timing and intensity of peaks of activity is important for public... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Syndromic surveillance systems are used by Public Health England (PHE) to detect changes in health care activity that are indicative of potential threats to public health. By providing early warning and situational awareness, these systems play a key role in supporting infectious disease... Read more

Content type: Abstract

When monitoring public health incidents using syndromic surveillance systems, Public Health England (PHE) uses the age of the presenting patient as a key indicator to further assess the severity, impact of the incident, and to provide intelligence on the likely cause. However the age... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Real-time syndromic surveillance requires daily surveillance of a range of health data sources. Most real-time data sources from health care systems exhibit large day of the week fluctuations as service provision and patient behaviour varies by day of the week. Regular day of the week effects... Read more

Content type: Abstract

While results from syndromic surveillance systems are commonly presented in the literature, few systems appear to have been thoroughly evaluated to examine which events can and cannot be detected, the time to detection and the efficacy of different syndromic surveillance data streams. Such an... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Syndromic surveillance systems often produce large numbers of detections due to excess activity (alarms) in their indicators. Few alarms are classified as alerts (public health events that may require a response). Decision-making in syndromic surveillance as to whether an alarm requires a... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Seasonal rises in respiratory illnesses are a major burden on primary care services. Public Health England (PHE), in collaboration with NHS 111, coordinate a national surveillance system based upon the daily calls received at the NHS 111 telehealth service. Daily calls are categorized according... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Whilst the sensitivity and specificity of traditional laboratory-based surveillance can be readily estimated, the situation is less clear cut for syndromic surveillance. Syndromic surveillance indicators based upon presenting symptoms, chief complaints or preliminary diagnoses are designed to... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Public Health England has developed a suite of syndromic surveillance systems, collecting data from a number of health care sources, and linking to public health action to try and improve the public health benefit of the surveillance.1 We aim to describe this national syndromic service,... Read more

Content type: Abstract

We assessed the impact of the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games on syndromic surveillance systems including the incidence of syndromic indictors and total contacts with health care.

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Mass gatherings can impact on the health of the public including importation of... Read more

Content type: Abstract

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