Welcome to the Surveillance Knowledge Repository

Click on a topic under the Key Topic Areas section in the left column, then select a resource  from the list of resources that appear for that topic. You may also search for specific topics by entering one or more keywords in the Search bar. You can filter the search results by Content Type, Year, or Author Name.

Submit

Key Topic Areas

Author Name

Tags

Reset filters

Since 2008, drug overdose deaths exceeded the number of motor vehicle traffic-related deaths in Indiana and the gap continues to widen1. As the opioid crisis rages on in the United States the federal government is providing funding opportunities to states, but it often takes years for best... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Oregon Public Health Division (OPHD), in collaboration with The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, implemented Oregon ESSENCE in 2011. ESSENCE is an automated, electronic syndromic surveillance system that captures emergency department data from hospitals across Oregon. While... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Syndromic data is shifting the way surveillance has been done traditionally. Most recently, surveillance has gone beyond city limits and county boundary lines. In southeast Texas, a regional consortium of public health agencies and stakeholders in the 13-County area governs the local ESSENCE... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Human MERS-CoV was first reported in September 2012. Globally, all reported cases have been linked through travel to or residence in the Arabian Peninsula with the exception of cases associated with an outbreak involving multiple health care facilities in the Republic of Korea ending in July... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Standard syndrome definitions for ED visits in ESSENCE rely on chief complaints. Visits with more words in the chief complaint field are more likely to match syndrome definitions. While using ESSENCE, we observed geographic differences in chief complaint length, apparently related to differences... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Oregon’s statewide syndromic surveillance system (Oregon ESSENCE) has been operational since 2012. Non-federal emergency department data (and several of their associated urgent care centers) are the primary source for the system, although other data sources have been added, including de-... Read more

Content type: Abstract

The public health problem identified by Alabama Department of Public Health Syndromic Surveillance (AlaSyS) was that the data reflected in the user application of ESSENCE (Electronic Surveillance System for the Early Notification of Community-based Epidemics) was underestimating occurrences of... Read more

Content type: Abstract

In spite of the noted benefits of syndromic surveillance, and more than a decade after it started gaining support, the primary use for syndromic surveillance appears to be largely for seasonal and jurisdictional disease monitoring, event response and situational awareness as opposed to its... Read more

Content type: Abstract

In 2005, the Cook County Department of Public Health (CCDPH) began using the Electronic Surveillance System for the Early Notification of Community-based Epidemics (ESSENCE) as an emergency department (ED)-based local syndromic surveillance program (LSSP); 23 (100%) of 23 hospitals in suburban... Read more

Content type: Abstract

The Louisiana Office of Public Health (OPH) Infectious Disease Epidemiology Section (IDEpi) conducts syndromic surveillance of Emergency Department (ED) visits through the Louisiana Early Event Detection System (LEEDS) and submits the collected data to ESSENCE. There are currently 86 syndromes... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Pages

Didn't find what you're looking for? Then try searching our archives.

Contact Us

NSSP Community of Practice

Email: syndromic@cste.org

 

This website is supported by Cooperative Agreement # 6NU38OT000297-02-01 Strengthening Public Health Systems and Services through National Partnerships to Improve and Protect the Nation's Health between the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists. Its contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of CDC. CDC is not responsible for Section 508 compliance (accessibility) on private websites.

Site created by Fusani Applications