Welcome to the Surveillance Knowledge Repository

Click on a topic under the Key Topic Areas section in the left column, then select a resource  from the list of resources that appear for that topic. You may also search for specific topics by entering one or more keywords in the Search bar. You can filter the search results by Content Type, Year, or Author Name.

Submit

Key Topic Areas

Author Name

Tags

Reset filters

The National Syndromic Surveillance Program (NSSP) is conducting a three-part webinar series to describe how data will flow to the BioSense Platform. This comprehensive series explores how data are ingested into the BioSense Platform and ESSENCE application and how BioSense 2.0 data are being... Read more

Content type: Webinar

In spite of the noted benefits of syndromic surveillance, and more than a decade after it started gaining support, the primary use for syndromic surveillance appears to be largely for seasonal and jurisdictional disease monitoring, event response and situational awareness as opposed to its... Read more

Content type: Abstract

The National Syndromic Surveillance Program (NSSP) conducted a three-part webinar series in 2016 to describe how data would flow to the BioSense Platform. This comprehensive series explored how data were to be ingested into the BioSense Platform and ESSENCE application and how BioSense 2.0 data... Read more

Content type: Surveillance Tools and Systems

Syndromic surveillance systems are large and complex technology projects that increasingly require large investments of financial and political capital to be sustainable. What was once a minor surveillance tool in the mid-2000s has evolved into a program that is regarded as valuable to public... Read more

Content type: Abstract

The Department of Defense conducts syndromic surveillance of health encounter visits of Military Health System (MHS) beneficiaries. Providers within the MHS assign up to 10 diagnosis codes to each health encounter visit. The diagnosis codes are grouped into syndrome and sub-syndrome categories.... Read more

Content type: Abstract

In 2012, the Oregon Public Health Division (OPHD) took advantage of the opportunity created by Meaningful Use, a Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) Incentive Program, to implement statewide syndromic surveillance. The Oregon syndromic surveillance project, or Oregon ESSENCE,... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Healthcare data, including emergency department (ED) and outpatient health visit data, are potentially useful to the public health community for multiple purposes, including programmatic and surveillance activities. These data are collected through several mechanisms, including administrative... Read more

Content type: Abstract

In October 2015, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released health advisory #384 to inform people about increases in fentanyl fatalities. Florida’s statewide syndromic surveillance system, Electronic Surveillance System for the Early Notification of Community-based Epidemics (... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Oregon Public Health Division (OPHD), in collaboration with the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, implemented Oregon ESSENCE in 2012. Oregon ESSENCE is an automated, electronic syndromic surveillance system that captures emergency department data. To strengthen the... Read more

Content type: Abstract

The Florida Department of Health (DOH) utilizes the Electronic Surveillance System for the Early Notification of Community Based Epidemics (ESSENCE-FL) as its statewide syndromic surveillance system. ESSENCE-FL comprises of chief complaint data from 231 of 240 EDs, representing 96 percent of the... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Pages

Didn't find what you're looking for? Then try searching our archives.

Contact Us

NSSP Community of Practice

Email: syndromic@cste.org

 

This website is supported by Cooperative Agreement # 6NU38OT000297-02-01 Strengthening Public Health Systems and Services through National Partnerships to Improve and Protect the Nation's Health between the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists. Its contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of CDC. CDC is not responsible for Section 508 compliance (accessibility) on private websites.

Site created by Fusani Applications