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This report, published April 2017 from Human Rights Watch, explores measures required for an effective program to prevent opioid overdose deaths and current legal, policy and other challenges to be addressed.

Content type: Report

Tennessee has experienced an increase of fatal and non-fatal drug overdoses which has been almost entirely driven by the opioid epidemic. Increased awareness by medical professionals, new legislation surrounding prescribing practices, and mandatory use of the state's prescription drug monitoring... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Presented January 11, 2018.

The purpose of the event was to stimulate and facilitate constructive communication and collaboration among analytic method developers and practitioners charged with routine public health surveillance, ranging from disease outbreak surveillance to chronic... Read more

Content type: Webinar

Black Hoosiers, the largest minority population in Indiana, make up almost 10% of the state's population, and accounted for 8% of the total resident drug overdose deaths from 2013-2017 compared to whites at 91%. However, a closer look at race-specific mortality rates might reveal racial... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Washington State experienced a five-fold increase in deaths from unintentional drug overdoses between 1998 and 2014. The PMP collects data on controlled substances prescribed to patients and makes the data available to healthcare providers, giving providers another tool for patient care and... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Nationally and in Wisconsin, heroin is the leading cause of opioid related death and hospitalization. Opioids are commonly prescribed for pain. Every day, over 1,000 people are treated in emergency departments for misusing prescription opioids. In 2015, more than 15,000 people died from... Read more

Content type: Abstract

As a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Enhanced State Opioid Overdose Surveillance (ESOOS) funded state, Kentucky started utilizing Emergency Medical Services (EMS) data to increase timeliness of state data on drug overdose events in late 2016. Using developed definitions of heroin... Read more

Content type: Abstract

This Fact Sheet, created by the Network for Public Health Law in May 2017 and updated as of December 6, 2017, provides a snapshot of current and proposed laws, regulations, and sub-regulatory sources governing mandatory disease reporting and a description of the laws and regulations governing... Read more

Content type: References

Opioid overdoses are a growing cause of mortality in the United States. Medical prescriptions for opioids are a risk factor for overdose. This observation raises concerns that patients may seek multiple opioid prescriptions, possibly increasing their overdose risk. One route for obtaining those... Read more

Content type: Abstract

The opioid epidemic is a multifaceted public health issue that requires a coordinated and dynamic response to address the ongoing changes in the trends of opioid overdoses. Access to timely and accurate data allows more targeted and effective programs and policies to prevent and reduce fatal and... Read more

Content type: Abstract

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