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Injury and violence are public health problems now-a-days all over the world. Over 950000 children less than 18 years of age die as a result of injuries, 95% of which occur in low and middle income countries (LMIC) including India. Unintentional injuries account for 90% of these cases. The death... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Suicide is a growing public health problem in the United States. From 2001 to 2016, ED visit rates for nonfatal self-harm, a common risk factor for suicide, increased 42%. To improve public health surveillance of suicide-related problems, including SI and SA, the Data and Surveillance Task Force... Read more

Content type: Abstract

National Health Statistics Reports, Number 100, January 23, 2017.

Abstract

This report describes a collaboration between the National Center for Health Statistics and the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control to develop proposed surveillance case definitions for injury... Read more

Content type: Report

A report of the Injury Surveillance Workgroup Region 9, Safe States Alliance, December 2016.

Executive Summary

Impetus for this report: On October 1, 2015 in the United States, ICD-10-CM replaced ICD-9-CM for coding information in hospital discharge, emergency department, and... Read more

Content type: Report

Road Traffic Injury is common cause of unintentional injury globally and Low and middle income countries account for 90%of 1.3 million Road Traffic Injury (RTI) deaths. In Africa region, Nigeria accounts for 25% of RTI mortality but has no comprehensive and reliable RTI surveillance system. Data... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Kansas storms can occur without warning and have potential to cause a multitude of health issues. Extreme weather preparedness and event monitoring for public health effects is being developed as a function of syndromic surveillance at the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE). The... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Kansas storms can occur without warning and have potential to cause a multitude of health issues. Extreme weather preparedness and event monitoring for public health effects is being developed as a function of syndromic surveillance at the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE). The... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Underage drinking is a significant public health problem in the United States as well as in Nebraska1-2. Alcohol consumption among underage youth accounts for approximately 5,000 deaths each year in the United States, including motor vehicle crash related deaths, homicides and suicides1. In... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Violence-related injuries are a major source of morbidity and mortality in NC. From 2005-2014, suicide and homicide ranked as NC's 11th and 16th causes of death, respectively. In 2014, there were 1,932 total violent deaths, of which 1,303 were due to suicide (67%), 536 due to homicide (28%), and... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Falls are a leading cause of fatal and nonfatal injury in NC. As the size of the older adult population is predicted to increase over the next few decades, it is likely that the incidence of falls-related morbidity and mortality will increase in tandem. In order to address this public health... Read more

Content type: Abstract

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