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On October 1, 2015, the number of ICD codes will expand from 14,000 in version 9 to 68,000 in version 10. The new code set will increase the specificity of reporting, allowing more information to be conveyed in a single code. It is anticipated that the conversion will have a significant impact... Read more

Content type: Abstract

This roundtable provided a forum for a diverse set of representatives from the local, state, federal and international public health care sectors to share tools, resources, experiences, and promising practices regarding the potential impact of the transition on their surveillance activities.... Read more

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The US Department of Health and Human Services has mandated that after October 1, 2015, all HIPAA covered entities must transition from using International Classification of Diseases version 9 (ICD- 9) codes to using version 10 (ICD-10) codes (www.cms.gov). This will impact public health... Read more

Content type: Abstract

The May arrival of two cases of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) in the US offered CDC’s BioSense SyS Program an opportunity to give CDC’s Emergency Operations Center (EOC) and state-and-local jurisdictions an enhanced national picture of MERS surveillance. BioSense jurisdictions can... Read more

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Between 2006 and 2013, the rate of emergency department (ED) visits related to mental and substance use disorders increased substantially. This increase was higher for mental disorders visits (55 percent for depression, anxiety or stress reactions and 52 percent for psychoses or bipolar... Read more

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In 2011, the CDC released the PHIN Implementation Guide (IG) for Syndromic Surveillance v.1 under the Public Health Information Network. In the intervening years, new technological advancements, EHR capabilities as well as epidemiological and Meaningful Use requirements have led to the periodic... Read more

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Syndromic surveillance seeks to systematically leverage health-related data in near "real-time" to understand the health of communities at the local, state, and federal level. The product of this process provides statistical insight on disease trends and healthcare utilization behaviors at the... Read more

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Accurately gauging the health status of a population during an event of public health significance (e.g. hurricanes, H1N1 2009 pandemic) in support of emergency response and situation awareness efforts can be a challenge for established public health surveillance systems in terms of geographic... Read more

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Concern over oral health-related ED visits stems from the increasing number of unemployed and uninsured, the cost burden of these visits, and the unavailability of indicated dental care in EDs [1]. Of particular interest to NC state public health planners are Medicaid-covered visits. Syndromic... Read more

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BioSense is a national program designed to improve the nation’s capabilities for conducting disease detection, monitoring, and real-time situational awareness. Currently, BioSense receives near real-time data from non-federal hospitals, as well as national daily batched data from the Departments... Read more

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