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Mapping ILI surveillance data can be useful in identifying the direction and speed of an outbreak and for focusing control measures for an efficient public health response. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) ILINet currently displays weekly ILI geographic data at a national/... Read more

Content type: Abstract

The 2014 Ebola outbreak in West Africa is one of the largest Ebola outbreaks in history. Early detection is critical for rapid initiation of treatment, infection control and emergency response plans. To facilitate clinicians’ ability to detect Ebola, various syndrome definitions have been... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Weather events such as a heat wave or a cold snap can cause a change to the number of patients and types of symptoms seen at a healthcare facility. Understanding the impact of weather patterns on ILI surveillance may be useful for early detection and trend analysis. In addition, weather patterns... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Special event driven syndromic surveillance is often initiated by public health departments with limited time for development of an automated surveillance framework, which can result in heavy reliance on frontline care providers and potentially miss early signs of emerging trends. To address... Read more

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Early detection of rarely occurring but potentially harmful diseases such as bio-threat agents (e.g., anthrax), chemical agents (e.g., sarin), and naturally occurring diseases (e.g., meningitis) is critical for rapid initiation of treatment, infection control measures, and emergency response... Read more

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This paper describes a methodology for applying natural language parsing (NLP) technologies, originally developed for analyzing biomedical journal articles, to the monitoring of emergency department patient charts for infectious diseases of interest.

Content type: Abstract

Real-time disease surveillance is critical for early detection of the covert release of a biological threat agent (BTA). Numerous software applications have been developed to detect emerging disease clusters resulting from either naturally occurring phenomena or from occult acts of bioterrorism... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Real-time disease surveillance is critical for early detection of the covert release of a biological threat agent (BTA). Numerous software applications have been developed to detect emerging disease clusters resulting from either naturally occurring phenomena or from occult acts of bioterrorism... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Detection of biological threat agents (BTAs) is critical to the rapid initiation of treatment, infection control measures, and public health emergency response plans. Due to the rarity of BTAs, standard methodology for developing syndrome definitions and measuring their validity is lacking.... Read more

Content type: Abstract

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention case definition of influenza-like illness (ILI) as fever with cough and/or sore throat casts a wide net resulting in lower sensitivity which can have major implications on public health surveillance and response.

 

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