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Harmful algal blooms (HABs) consist of colonies of prokaryotic photosynthetic bacteria algae that can produce harmful toxins. The toxins produced by HABs are considered a One Health issue. HABs can occur in all types of water (fresh, brackish, and salt water) and are composed of cyanobacteria or... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Overdose deaths involving opioids (i.e., opioid pain relievers and illicit opioids such as heroin) accounted for at least 63% (N = 33,091) of overdose deaths in 2015. Overdose deaths related to illicit opioids, heroin and illicitly-manufactured fentanyl, have rapidly increased since 2010. For... Read more

Content type: Abstract

The Louisiana Office of Public Health (OPH) Infectious Disease Epidemiology Section (IDEpi) conducts syndromic surveillance of Emergency Department (ED) visits through the Louisiana Early Event Detection System (LEEDS) and submits the collected data to ESSENCE. There are currently 86 syndromes... Read more

Content type: Abstract

MISSION

The mission of the Syndrome Definition Committee (SDC) is to create, evaluate, and refine syndrome definitions, link users with similar syndrome definition needs, and create documentation along the way. We seek to be a resource for collaboration and best practices in the syndrome... Read more

Content type: Meeting Recordings & Notes

Syndromic surveillance has become an integral component of public health surveillance efforts within the state of Florida. The near real-time nature of these data are critical during events such as the Zika virus outbreak in Florida in 2016 and in the aftermath of Hurricane Irma in 2017.... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Timely influenza data can help public health decision-makers identify influenza outbreaks and respond with preventative measures. DoD ESSENCE has the unique advantage of ingesting multiple data sources from the Military Health System (MHS), including outpatient, inpatient, and emergency... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Since 2015, CDC’s Division of Health Informatics and Surveillance staff have conducted evaluations to provide information on the utility, functionality, usability and user satisfaction associated with the National Syndromic Surveillance Program’s BioSense Platform tools. The BioSense... Read more

Content type: Abstract

 

2021 MEETINGS

February 2021 - Recording (Note: Recording paused for clearance purposes), Agenda   

January 2021 - Recording (Note: Recording paused for clearance purposes), Agenda

 

2020 MEETINGS

December 2020 - Recording (Note: Recording paused for... Read more

Content type: Meeting Recordings & Notes

The National Syndromic Surveillance Program (NSSP) is conducting a three-part webinar series to describe how data will flow to the BioSense Platform. This comprehensive series explores how data are ingested into the BioSense Platform and ESSENCE application and how BioSense 2.0 data are being... Read more

Content type: Webinar

Oregon Public Health Division (OPHD), in collaboration with the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, implemented Oregon ESSENCE in 2012. Oregon ESSENCE is an automated, electronic syndromic surveillance system that captures emergency department data. To strengthen the... Read more

Content type: Abstract

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