Welcome to the Surveillance Knowledge Repository

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Recent years' informatics advances have increased availability of various sources of health-monitoring information to agencies responsible for disease surveillance. These sources differ in clinical relevance and reliability, and range from streaming statistical indicator evidence to outbreak... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Maryland has a powerful syndromic surveillance system, ESSENCE, which is used for the early detection of disease outbreaks, suspicious patterns of illness, and public health emergencies. ESSENCE incorporates traditional and nontraditional health indicators from multiple data sources (emergency... Read more

Content type: Abstract

The ESSENCE system is a community-driven disease surveillance system. Installed in over 25 jurisdictions across the US, the system is built on a single codebase that is shared across all instances. While each individual location can customize many of the settings, data sources, and... Read more

Content type: Abstract

The motivation for this project is to provide greater situational awareness to DoD epidemiologists monitoring the health of military personnel and their dependents. An increasing number of data sources of varying clinical specificity and timeliness are available to the staff. The challenge is to... Read more

Content type: Abstract

The National Syndromic Surveillance Program's (NSSP) instance of ESSENCE* in the BioSense Platform generates about 35,000 statistical alerts each week. Local ESSENCE instances can generate as many as 5,000 statistical alerts each week. While some states have well-coordinated processes for... Read more

Content type: Abstract

 

2020 MEETINGS

July 2020 Ad Hoc Meeting (R for Biosurveillance Call: NSSP Coronavirus Surveillance State Report R demo) - Recording

July 2020 (Topic: Considerations for COVID-19 Dashboards and Reports) - Recording, Slides, Related Publication

June 2020 (Topic:... Read more

Content type: Meeting Recordings & Notes

The 2016 U.S. Olympic Track and Field Team Trials were held July 1-10 in Eugene, OR. This mass gathering included over 1,000 athletes, 1,500 volunteers, and 175,000 spectators. The Oregon Public Health Division (PHD) and Lane County Public Health (LCPH) participated in pre-event planning and... Read more

Content type: Abstract

The National Syndromic Surveillance Program (NSSP) is conducting a three-part webinar series to describe how data will flow to the BioSense Platform. This comprehensive series explores how data are ingested into the BioSense Platform and ESSENCE application and how BioSense 2.0 data are being... Read more

Content type: Webinar

This is the first installment of the ISDS Opioid Surveillance Webinar Series, June - July, 2017. Click here for Part 2 of the Opioid Surveillance Webinar Series and here for Part 3.

 

This presentation describes how CDC has partnered with states to develop case definitions... Read more

Content type: Webinar

In 2012, the Oregon Public Health Division (OPHD) took advantage of the opportunity created by Meaningful Use, a Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) Incentive Program, to implement statewide syndromic surveillance. The Oregon syndromic surveillance project, or Oregon ESSENCE,... Read more

Content type: Abstract

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Email: syndromic@cste.org

 

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