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The Department of Defense conducts syndromic surveillance of health encounter visits of Military Health System (MHS) beneficiaries. Providers within the MHS assign up to 10 diagnosis codes to each health encounter visit. The diagnosis codes are grouped into syndrome and sub-syndrome categories.... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Human MERS-CoV was first reported in September 2012. Globally, all reported cases have been linked through travel to or residence in the Arabian Peninsula with the exception of cases associated with an outbreak involving multiple health care facilities in the Republic of Korea ending in July... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Wildfires occur annually in Oregon, and the health risks of wildfire smoke are well documented1. Before implementing syndromic surveillance through Oregon ESSENCE, assessing the health effects of wildfires in real time was very challenging. Summer 2015 marked the first wildfire season with 60 of... Read more

Content type: Abstract

One of the greatest hurdles for BioSense Onboarding is the process of validating data received to ensure it contains Data Elements of Interest (DEOI) needed for syndromic surveillance. Efforts to automate this process are critical to meet existing and future demands for facility onboarding... Read more

Content type: Abstract

VA began using ESSENCE as a public health surveillance tool in 2005. The system offered alerting capability for pre-defined syndromes and querying capability for outpatient ICD-9 diagnosis codes. Herein, we highlight examples of how we have invested in upgrades to analytic capabilities and... Read more

Content type: Abstract

National studies estimate that respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is responsible for one in 38 emergency department (ED) visits for children < 5 years old. The Council for State and Territorial Epidemiologists position statement (13-ID-07): “RSV-Associated Pediatric Mortality” advocates for... Read more

Content type: Abstract

On 3/29/2017, the Maricopa County Department of Public Health (MCDPH) received three reports of confirmed HAV infection from an onsite clinic at Campus A that assists individuals experiencing homelessness, a population at risk for HAV transmission. To identify the scope of the problem, the... Read more

Content type: Abstract

The Great American Solar Eclipse of 2017 provided a rare opportunity to view a complete solar eclipse on the American mainland. Much of Oregon was in the path of totality and forecasted to have clear skies. Ahead of the event, OPHD aggregated a list of 107 known gatherings in mostly rural areas... Read more

Content type: Abstract

The Kansas Syndromic Surveillance Program (KSSP) utilizes the ESSENCE v.1.20 program provided by the National Syndromic Surveillance Program to view and analyze Kansas Emergency Department (ED) data. Methods that allow an ESSENCE user to query both the Discharge Diagnosis (DD) and Chief... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Syndromic surveillance is used routinely to detect outbreaks of disease earlier than traditional methods due to its ability to automatically acquire data in near real-time. Missouri has used emergency department (ED) visits to monitor and track seasonal influenza activity since 2006.

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