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Indiana utilizes the Electronic Surveillance System for the Early Notification of Community-Based Epidemics (ESSENCE) to collect and analyze data from participating hospital emergency departments. This real-time collection of health related data is used to identify disease clusters and unusual... Read more

Content type: Abstract

Presented March 27, 2018.

During this 90-minute session, Aaron Kite-Powell, M.S., from CDC and Wayne Loschen, M.S., from JHU-APL provided an overview of tips and tricks in ESSENCE and answered questions from the audience regarding ESSENCE functions, capabilities and uses.

Content type: Webinar

The ESSENCE system is a community-driven disease surveillance system. Installed in over 25 jurisdictions across the US, the system is built on a single codebase that is shared across all instances. While each individual location can customize many of the settings, data sources, and... Read more

Content type: Abstract

The motivation for this project is to provide greater situational awareness to DoD epidemiologists monitoring the health of military personnel and their dependents. An increasing number of data sources of varying clinical specificity and timeliness are available to the staff. The challenge is to... Read more

Content type: Abstract

The National Syndromic Surveillance Program's (NSSP) instance of ESSENCE* in the BioSense Platform generates about 35,000 statistical alerts each week. Local ESSENCE instances can generate as many as 5,000 statistical alerts each week. While some states have well-coordinated processes for... Read more

Content type: Abstract

The National Syndromic Surveillance Program (NSSP) Team hosted the 3rd webinar of its Fall 2020 New Site Onboarding Window on November 16, 2020. The webinar orients viewers to the Access & Management Center (AMC), AMC Data Access Rules, and ESSENCE.

View the recording of the webinar ... Read more

Content type: Webinar

The Department of Defense conducts syndromic surveillance of health encounter visits of Military Health System (MHS) beneficiaries. Providers within the MHS assign up to 10 diagnosis codes to each health encounter visit. The diagnosis codes are grouped into syndrome and sub-syndrome categories.... Read more

Content type: Abstract

In spite of the noted benefits of syndromic surveillance, and more than a decade after it started gaining support, the primary use for syndromic surveillance appears to be largely for seasonal and jurisdictional disease monitoring, event response and situational awareness as opposed to its... Read more

Content type: Abstract

This document developed by the Oregon Public Health Division, Acute and Communicable Disease Prevention, is designed to help Oregon ESSENCE users create and interpret time series graphs that overlay health and weather or air quality data from a specific geographic area.

Content type: References

In January 2017, the NSSP transitioned their BioSense analytical tools to Electronic Surveillance System for Early Notification of Community-Based Epidemics (ESSENCE). The chief complaint field in BioSense 2.0 was a concatenation of the record's chief complaint, admission reason, triage notes,... Read more

Content type: Abstract

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