Beginner R methods for syndromic surveillance data validation

There are currently 123 healthcare facilities sending data to the Washington (WA) State syndromic surveillance program. Of these facilities, 30 are sending to the National Syndromic Surveillance Program'™s (NSSP) production environment. The remainder are undergoing validation or in queue for validation. Given the large number of WA healthcare facilities awaiting validation, staff within the state syndromic surveillance program developed methods in R to reduce the amount of time required to validate data from an individual facility.

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January 25, 2018

Developing and Validating a Fireworks-Related Syndrome Definition in Kansas

Across the U.S.A., multiple people seek treatment for fireworks-related injuries around the July 4th holiday. Syndromic surveillance in Kansas allows for near real-time analysis of the injuries occurring during the firework selling season. During the 2017 July 4th holiday, the Kansas Syndromic Surveillance Program (KSSP) production data feed received data from 88 EDs at excellent quality and timeliness. Previous and current firework safety messaging in Kansas is dependent on voluntary reporting from hospitals across the state.

January 25, 2018

Using Drug Overdose Syndromic Surveillance Data to Impact Local Public Health Action

Since 2008, drug overdose deaths exceeded the number of motor vehicle traffic-related deaths in Indiana and the gap continues to widen1. As the opioid crisis rages on in the United States the federal government is providing funding opportunities to states, but it often takes years for best practices to be developed, shared, and published. Indiana State Department of Health (ISDH) has developed a standard process for monitoring and alerting local health partners of increases in drug overdoses captured in Indiana’s syndromic surveillance system (ESSENCE).

January 21, 2018

Validation of Syndromic ILI Data for Use in CDC’s ILINet Surveillance, Pennsylvania

ILINet is a CDC program that has been used for years for influenza-like illness (ILI) surveillance, using a network of outpatient providers who volunteer to track and report weekly the number of visits due to ILI and the total number of visits to their practice. Pennsylvania has a network of 95 providers and urgent care clinics that submit data to ILINet. However, ongoing challenges in recruiting and retaining providers, and inconsistent weekly reporting are barriers to receiving accurate, representative, and timely ILI surveillance data year-round.

January 21, 2018

Travel and Triage: Pilot project to detect infections after medical tourism procedures

EpiCenter, NJ’s statewide syndromic surveillance system, collects ED registration data. The system uses chief complaint data to classify ED visits into syndrome categories and provides alerts to state and local health departments for surveillance anomalies. After the 2014 Ebola outbreak in West Africa, the New Jersey Department of Health (NJDOH) started collecting medical notes including triage notes, which contain more specific ED visit information than chief complaint, from 10 EDs to strengthen HAI syndromic surveillance efforts.

January 25, 2018

Enhanced surveillance to monitor response to a provincial overdose emergency, Canada

On April 14, 2016, British Columbia (BC)’s Provincial Health Officer declared a public health emergency due to a significant increase in drug-related overdoses and deaths in the Province. Despite the declaration, 161 suspected drug overdose deaths were reported across the Province in December 2016, a 137% increase over the number of deaths occurring in the same month of 2015. In response to the surge overdoses, Vancouver Coastal Health Authority (VCH), one of 5 health regions within BC, rapidly implemented a number of novel harm reduction initiatives.

January 25, 2018

Evaluation Activities from the National Syndromic Surveillance Program

Syndromic surveillance uses near-real-time Emergency Department healthcare and other data to improve situational awareness and inform activities implemented in response to public health concerns. The National Syndromic Surveillance Program (NSSP) is a collaboration among state and local health departments, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), other federal organizations, and other entities, to strengthen the means for and the practice of syndromic surveillance.

January 21, 2018

Syndromic Surveillance for Situation Awareness: Understanding Syndrome Performance

The August 21, 2017 total solar eclipse in Idaho was anticipated to lead to a large influx of visitors in many communities, prompting a widespread effort to assure Idaho was prepared. To support these efforts, the Idaho Syndromic Surveillance program (ISSp) developed a plan to enhance situation awareness during the event by conducting syndromic surveillance using emergency department (ED) visit data contributed to the National Syndromic Surveillance Program’s BioSense platform by Idaho hospitals.

January 21, 2018

Public Health Surveillance for the Great American Solar Eclipse in Oregon

The Great American Solar Eclipse of 2017 provided a rare opportunity to view a complete solar eclipse on the American mainland. Much of Oregon was in the path of totality and forecasted to have clear skies. Ahead of the event, OPHD aggregated a list of 107 known gatherings in mostly rural areas across the state, some with estimated attendance of up to 30,000 attendees. Temporary food vendors and a range of sanitation solutions (including open latrines) were planned. International travelers were expected, along with large numbers of visitors traveling by car on the day of the eclipse.

January 25, 2018

Surveillance for Prevention & Identification of GI Illness Outbreaks Associated with Swimming Pools

Swimming in contaminated pools can cause gastroenteritis from water contaminated by viruses, bacteria, or parasites. Germs that cause gastroenteritis are shed in feces of infected persons, and easily spread to uninfected persons swimming in pools. Symptoms of gastrointestinal illness can include nausea, vomiting, watery or bloody diarrhea, and weight loss. Common causes of swimming-related gastroenteritis included viruses (norovirus), parasites (giardia, cryptosporidium), and bacteria (Escherichia coli, Shigella).

January 25, 2018

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