Evaluation of Syndromic Surveillance in Detecting Hepatitis A in Los Angeles County

In early 2017, HAV outbreaks were identified in San Diego County (490 cases) and Santa Cruz County (73 cases) in California, affecting primarily the homeless and/or illicit drug users. As of October 10, 2017, LAC had identified 12 outbreak-related HAV cases. Due to LAC’s proximity to San Diego County, and its own large homeless population, the syndromic surveillance team of the LAC Department of Public Health created a syndrome category and began querying its ED data to monitor for any increase in HAV-related visits.

Objective:

January 25, 2018

Monitoring Out-of-State Patients during a 2017 Hurricane Response using ESSENCE

Syndromic surveillance is the monitoring of symptom combinations (i.e., syndromes) or other indicators within a population to inform public health actions. The Tennessee Department of Health (TDH) collects emergency department (ED) data from more than 70 hospitals across Tennessee to support statewide syndromic surveillance activities. Hospitals in Tennessee typically provide data within 48 hours of a patient encounter.

January 19, 2018

Correlation of Tweets Mentioning Influenza Illness and Traditional Surveillance Data

The use of social media as a syndromic sentinel for diseases is an emerging field of growing relevance as the public begins to share more online, particularly in the area of influenza. Several applications have been developed to predict or monitor influenza activity using publicly posted or self-reported online data; however, few have prioritized accuracy at the local level. In 2016, the Cook County Department of Public Health (CCDPH) collected localized Twitter information to evaluate its utility as a potential influenza sentinel data source.

January 21, 2018

What value can Google search data add to existing syndromic surveillance systems?

Globally, there have been various studies assessing trends in Google search terms in the context of public health surveillance1. However, there has been a predominant focus on individual health outcomes such as influenza, with limited evidence on the added value and practical impact on public health action for a range of diseases and conditions routinely monitored by existing surveillance programmes. A proposed advantage is improved timeliness relative to established surveillance systems.

January 25, 2018

Effect of the Work Week on Demographics of Heat-Related Illness Patients in Syndromic Surveillance

As global temperatures increase, so too does interest in the effect of climate change on the population’s health. 2016 represented the hottest year on record globally and well above the 20th century average in Virginia. With large-scale climate change comes an increase in severe weather patterns, including heat waves. Heat waves can have immense health impacts on a community, including heat stroke, heat exhaustion, and dehydration.

January 25, 2018

Use of Diagnosis Code in Mental Health Syndrome Definition

Between 2006 and 2013, the rate of emergency department (ED) visits related to mental and substance use disorders increased substantially. This increase was higher for mental disorders visits (55 percent for depression, anxiety or stress reactions and 52 percent for psychoses or bipolar disorders) than for substance use disorders (37 percent) visits. This increasing number of ED visits by patients with mental disorders indicates a growing burden on the health-care delivery system.

January 19, 2018

Enhancing Epidemic Detection Using Syndromic Surveillance and Early Notification Methods

Early Notification Detection Systems have taken a critical role in providing early notice of disease outbreaks. To improve the detection methods for disease outbreaks, many detection methods have been created and implemented. However, there is limited information on the effectively of syndromic surveillance in Thailand. Knowing the performance, strengths and weakness of these surveillance systems in providing early warning for outbreaks will increase disease outbreak detection capacity in Thailand.

Objective:

January 21, 2018

Updates to the Implementation Guide for Syndromic Surveillance

In 2011, the CDC released the PHIN Implementation Guide (IG) for Syndromic Surveillance v.1 under the Public Health Information Network. In the intervening years, new technological advancements, EHR capabilities as well as epidemiological and Meaningful Use requirements have led to the periodic update and revision of the IG through informal and semi-structured solicitation and collection of comments from across public health, governmental, academic, and EHR vendor stakeholders.

January 25, 2018

Investigating Other Syndrome in ESSENCE from a Data Quality Perspective

The Louisiana Office of Public Health (OPH) Infectious Disease Epidemiology Section (IDEpi) conducts syndromic surveillance of Emergency Department (ED) visits through the Louisiana Early Event Detection System (LEEDS) and submits the collected data to ESSENCE. There are currently 86 syndromes defined in LEEDS including infectious disease, injury and environmental exposure syndromes, among others. LEEDS uses chief complaint, admit reason, and/or diagnosis fields to tag visits to relevant syndromes.

January 25, 2018

Syndromic Surveillance Analysis & Interpretation

Presented January 31, 2018

 

David Swenson presented the following slides during the 2018 ISDS Annual Conference in Orlando, Florida. This presentation provides a use case for developing and implementing surveillance prodocols to conduct public health monitoring, analyze data collected, and engage partners/leadership in follow-up procedures.

 

Presenter: David Swenson, AHEDD Project Manager, Infectious Disease Surveillance Section DPHS, DHHS, New Hampshire

January 26, 2019

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Email: syndromic@cste.org

 

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