Phylogenetic analysis of Ukrainian Bacillus anthracis strains from various sources

Anthrax is a widely spread zoonotic disease with natural transmissive cycle involving wildlife, livestock and humans [1]. It is caused by Bacillus anthracis, a highly pathogenic gram-positive, spore-producing bacterium, which poses a serious threat to public and animal health due to its mortality both for animals and for humans [2, 3, 4]. The ability of B. anthracis spores to remain viable in soils for decades enables their isolation from freely accessible environment [5].

June 18, 2019

Anthrax Assist: Modeling Tool for Planning and Decision Support During Early Days of an Anthrax Event

Presented April 24, 2018.

*This article was selected as the second prize awardee of the 2018 ISDS Awards for Outstanding Research Articles in Biosurveillance in the category of "Scientific Achievement."

April 24, 2018

Current assessment of risks of anthrax outbreaks in Ukraine

Anthrax is an acute especially dangerous infectious disease of animals and humans. Bacillus anthracis is a potential bioterrorism tool. In Ukraine, there are favorable natural conditions for the spread of anthrax. There are 13.5 thousand of constantly anthrax-troubled points. Anthrax epidemic situation in Ukraine could be characterized as unstable. Because of the continuing reform of Ukrainian human health entities, the State Sanitary Epidemiological Service (SSES) has lost its control functions and is remaining in an uncertain state, which increases possible risks.

September 07, 2017

Anthrax in Human and Livestock: Investigation and Response, Turkana-Kenya, 2012

Timely outbreak response requires effective early warning and surveillance systems. This investigation points out the important role that livestock keepers can play in veterinary surveillance. The investigation revealed that pastoralists had good traditional knowledge concerning livestock diseases in general and anthrax in particular. They provided detailed and accurate clinical descriptions of the disease, had greater appreciation of the risk factors associated with the disease, and showed a stronger recall of the outbreak history.

September 25, 2017

Georgia's Choice: Moving One Health Forward

Anthrax is endemic and enzootic in Georgia with cases being registered since 1881 with over 2000 foci identified. Since 2005, 439 laboratory confirmed and 211 probable human cases and 190 laboratory confirmed animal cases have been registered. A case-control study performed in 2012 by the National Centre for Disease Control and Public Health (NCDC), National Food Agency (NFA) and the Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Program (FELTP) found the main transition routes for human cases are slaughtering diseased animals and handling raw meat without protective equipment.

October 05, 2017

Developing the One Health Approach to Anthrax Control in the Country of Georgia

Anthrax is endemic and enzootic in Georgia with cases being registered since 1881 with over 2000 foci identified. Since 2005, 439 laboratory confirmed and 211 probable human cases and 190 laboratory confirmed animal cases have been registered. A case-control study performed in 2012 by the National Centre for Disease Control and Public Health (NCDC), National Food Agency (NFA) and the Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Program (FELTP) found the main transition routes for human cases are slaughtering diseased animals and handling raw meat without protective equipment.

October 31, 2017

Surveillance of Anthrax Foci Across Pipeline Constructions in Georgia, 2003-2014

Anthrax is a widely distributed endemic infection in Georgia, affecting nearly the entire country. Many of the human cases that are annually registered are agriculturally acquired. Anthrax remains a public health risk due to active, resistant soil foci. More than 2,000 anthrax affected areas are registered in the country; around 10% of them are active.

September 19, 2017

Cutaneous Anthrax surveillance by Person, Place, and Time in Georgia (2008-2013)

Cutaneous anthrax is endemic in Georgia. The EIDSS program captures notifications from 72 municipal public health centers. It links urgent notification, case investigation data, and laboratory data on an online basis. Eleven virulent and 4 non-virulent strains of B. anthracis have been isolated. Genotype GK 35 and GK 44 are strains found in the Turkish-Southern Caucasian region. It is hypothesized that human rates are caused by increased contact with infected animals.

October 03, 2017

Ten Years After Amerithrax: Have Improvements to Our Bioterrorism and Influenza Surveillance Networks Enhanced Our Preparedness?

The use of syndromic surveillance systems by state and local health departments for the detection of bioterrorist events and emerging infections has greatly increased since 2001. While these systems have proven useful for tracking influenza and identifying large outbreaks, the value of these systems in the early detection of bioterrorism events has been under constant evaluation [3,4].

Objective

May 02, 2019

Use of emergency department data for case finding following a community anthrax exposure

On 24 December 2009, a female New Hampshire resident was confirmed to have gastrointestinal anthrax on the basis of clinical findings and laboratory testing. Her source of anthrax was not immediately known, so the New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Services, in conjunction with several other state and federal agencies, conducted a comprehensive epidemiologic investigation, which included active surveillance to identify any additional anthrax cases from a similar exposure.

June 20, 2019

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