What is a success story and how do I write one?

Presented March 22, 2018.

Are you facing one of the barriers to writing a story about your surveillance data in action listed below?

Barriers:

  • I don't know what a success story is.
  • I’m not sure if I have a story to share.
  • I have a story, but I don't know how to share it with the community
  • I don't have time to document my story

Have you been asked to write a “success story” but you don’t know where to start? Are you not sure what counts as a success?

March 22, 2018

Syndromic Surveillance – Reports of Successes from the Field

Syndromic surveillance uses near-real-time emergency department and other health care data for enhancing public health situational awareness and informing public health activities. In recent years, continued progress has been made in developing and strengthening syndromic surveillance activities.

January 21, 2018

Using Syndromic Surveillance for All-Hazards Public Health Surveillance: Successes, Challenges, and the Future

Fifteen years have passed since the Public Health Security and Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response Act of 2002 called for the establishment of nationwide surveillance and reporting mechanisms to detect bioterrorism-related events. In the 1990s, several health departments established surveillance systems to detect prediagnostic (ie, before diagnoses are confirmed) signs and symptoms for the early identification of disease occurrences.

August 28, 2017

Syndromic Surveillance Revolution? Public Health Benefits of Modernizing the Emergency Care Patient Health Record in England

Emergency medicine is a recognized specialty in the United Kingdom (UK), with formal training and accreditation conducted and governed by the Royal College of Emergency Medicine. Health care in the UK is publicly funded and provided by the National Health Service (NHS) through a residence-based (rather than insurance-based) system. Emergency care within emergency departments (EDs) is currently provided free at the point of delivery for everyone, including non-UK residents.

August 28, 2017

Exercise Demonstrates Effective Syndromic Surveillance Response Process

Currently, Indiana monitors emergency department patient chief complaint data from 73 geographically dispersed hospitals. These data are analyzed using the Electronic Surveillance System for the Early Notification of Community-based Epidemics application. 

July 30, 2018

Increasing the Return-on-Investment from Syndromic Surveillance: Putting the Systems to Work for Routine Local Health Department Activities

Since October 2004, the Indiana State Health Department and the Marion County Health Department have been developing and using a syndromic surveillance system based on emergency department admission data. The system currently receives standards-based HL7 emergency department visit data, including free-text chief complaints from 72 hospitals throughout the state. Fourteen of these hospitals are in Marion County, which serves the Indianapolis metropolitan region (population 865,000).

 

Objective

July 30, 2018

Disease Surveillance among Katrina Evacuees in Shelters - Use of a Web-Based Surveillance System during an Emergency Response

On Monday, August 29, 2005, Hurricane Katrina struck the Gulf Coast. Outside of the affected areas of TX, LA, MS, and AL, GA received the largest number of these evacuees, approximately 125,000. By August 30, 2005, GA began receiving a total of approximately 1,300 NDMS patients from flights arriving at Dobbins Air Force Base. Within days, Georgia established 13 shelters for evacuees. Crowded shelters can increase the risk for communicable diseases. In addition, many evacuees left behind needed medications, thus increasing the risk for chronic disease exacerbations.

 

July 30, 2018

Kansas Uses Syndromic Surveillance Data to Educate the Public and Providers about Rabies

Rabies is caused by a virus spread to people from the saliva and neural tissue of infected animals. The most common mode of transmission is through the bite of a rabid animal; however, rabies can be transmitted through non-bite exposures (e.g., transplant of organs or tissue, contamination of mucous membranes with saliva or neural tissue from an infected animal). Rabies has been recognized throughout history due to its neurotropic nature and because it is nearly 100% fatal following symptom onset.

November 29, 2018

Contact Us

NSSP Community of Practice

Email: syndromic@cste.org

 

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