Update on Analysis of Shared Syndromic Data for Severe Respiratory Injury Surveillance

During this webinar, Michael Coletta and Aaron Kite-Powell (CDC’s National Syndromic Surveillance Program) presented analyses of syndromic data for the outbreak of lung injury associated with the use of e-cigarette, or vaping, products.

CALL RESOURCES

December 03, 2019

Monitoring Sexual Violence Visits in Emergency Department Data to Improve Public Health

Although sexual violence is a pressing public health and safety issue, it has historically been challenging to monitor population trends with precision. Approximately 31% of incidents of sexual violence are reported to law enforcement and only 5% lead to an arrest1, making the use of law enforcement data challenging. Syndromic surveillance data from emergency departments provides an opportunity to use care-seeking to more accurately surveil sexual violence without introducing additional burdens on either patients or healthcare providers.

June 18, 2019

Utilization History of Emergency Medical Services Among West Virginia Drug Overdose Decedents

West Virginia continues to lead the nation in drug overdose deaths per capita. In 2016, the age-adjusted rate of drug overdose deaths was 52 per 100,0001. In the same year, there were roughly 64,000 overdose deaths in the United States, a 21.5% rate increase from 20151. The drug overdose epidemic in West Virginia has taken a significant toll on individuals, families, communities, and resources.

June 18, 2019

Evaluation of Pedestrian/Bicycle Crash Injury Case Definitions for Use with NC DETECT

Over the last few decades, the United States has made considerable progress in decreasing the incidence of motor vehicle occupants injured and killed in traffic collisions.1 However, there is still a need for continued motor vehicle crash (MVC) injury surveillance, particularly for vulnerable road users, such as pedestrians and bicyclists.

June 18, 2019

Surveillance in Action: Producing and Disseminating County-Level Data for Firearm Injury Prevention

Presented November 8, 2018.

The data and program leads from Public Health – Seattle & King County’s firearm data team will discuss how their local health department produces and analyzes some of the best available firearm injury prevention data in the country, including information from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Survey (BRFSS) firearm module. We will describe how our data have been used in community, policy, and health care settings and discuss relevant lessons learned.

Presenters

November 15, 2018

Development and Piloting of National Injury Surveillance System of Sri Lanka

In Sri Lanka, a major drawback in injury prevention is the lack of complete, accurate and timely data. To fulfill this data need, in 2006, Sri Lanka's Trauma Secretariat piloted an Injury Surveillance System (ISS) in four hospitals. This comprised of two parts: a paper-based data collection tool (Trauma Surveillance Record or TSR) and its corresponding software application. TSR recorded ICD-10 Chapter XIX codes related to the diagnoses of injuries, but did not record the Chapter XX codes pertaining to external causes of morbidity which provide essential knowledge for injury prevention.

August 22, 2018

Using injury surveillance to assess sport and recreation-related heat illness

Although heat illness is preventable, it is a leading cause of death among U.S. high school and college athletes (1). Despite this, the total burden of heat illness during sports and recreation is unknown. With over 250 million U.S. residents reporting occasional participation in sports or recreational activities (2), there is a large population at risk.

Objective

To examine the incidence and characteristics of heat illness during sports and recreation.

May 02, 2019

Disaster Surveillance Revisited: Passive, Active and Electronic Syndromic Surveillance during Hurricane Katrina, New Orleans, LA - 2005

Surveillance strategies following major natural disasters have varied widely with respect to methods used to collect and analyze data. Following Hurricane Katrina, public health concerns included infectious disease outbreaks, injuries, mental health and exacerbation of preexisting chronic conditions resulting from unprecedented population displacement and disruption of public health services and health-care infrastructure.

 

Objective

July 30, 2018

Use of Syndromic Data for Surveillance of Hurricane-Related Injuries in Miami-Dade County, FL

In 2005, three hurricanes made landfall in Florida, with Hurricane Wilma having the most severe impact on Miami-Dade County. Syndromic surveillance is typically used to detect bioterrorism or natural disease outbreaks before specific diagnoses are made. After Wilma, however, the Miami-Dade County Health Department assessed the utility of syndromic data for surveillance of hurricane-related injuries.

 

Objective

July 30, 2018

Disease Surveillance among Katrina Evacuees in Shelters - Use of a Web-Based Surveillance System during an Emergency Response

On Monday, August 29, 2005, Hurricane Katrina struck the Gulf Coast. Outside of the affected areas of TX, LA, MS, and AL, GA received the largest number of these evacuees, approximately 125,000. By August 30, 2005, GA began receiving a total of approximately 1,300 NDMS patients from flights arriving at Dobbins Air Force Base. Within days, Georgia established 13 shelters for evacuees. Crowded shelters can increase the risk for communicable diseases. In addition, many evacuees left behind needed medications, thus increasing the risk for chronic disease exacerbations.

 

July 30, 2018

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Email: syndromic@cste.org

 

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