Electronic Processing of Antimicrobial Susceptibilities to Enhance Communicable Disease Surveillance

The emerging threat of antimicrobial resistant organisms is a pressing public health concern. Surveillance for antimicrobial resistance can prevent infections, protect patients in the healthcare setting and improve antimicrobial use. In 2018, the Utah Department of Health mandated the reporting of antimicrobial susceptibility panels performed on selected organisms. Utah utilizes the Electronic Message Staging Area (EMSA), a home-grown application to translate, process, and enter electronic laboratory results into UT-NEDSS, Utah'™s integrated disease surveillance system.

June 18, 2019

Potential Applications of Emerging Technologies in Disease Surveillance

With the increase in the amount of public health data along with the growth of public health informatics, it is important for epidemiologists to understand the current trends in technology and the impact they may have in the field. Because it is unfeasible for public health professionals to be an expert in every emerging technology, this presentation seeks to provide them with a better understanding of how emerging technologies may impact the field and the level of expertise required to realize benefits from the new technologies.

June 18, 2019

The Longitudinal Record: Linking Hepatitis A Outbreak Cases and Syndromic HL7 Data

With increasing availability of syndromic meaningful use data, new approaches to disease surveillance utilizing linkages to other data systems are possible. Expanded communicable disease information may be valuable during outbreaks or other public health emergencies. San Diego County is experiencing a significant and protracted hepatitis A outbreak. The disease has been transmitted person-to-person through close contact or through a fecally-contaminated environment, and has been primarily affecting homeless people and injection and non-injection illicit drug users.

January 21, 2018

Using a One Health Aapproach to Build an Integrated Surveillance Data System

Environmental Public Health Zoonotic Disease surveillance includes veternary, environmental, and vector data. Surveillance systems within each sector may appear disparate from each other, although they are actually complimentaly and closely allied. Consolidating and integrating data in to one application can be challenging, but there are commonalities shared by all. The goal of the One Health Integrated Data Sysytem is to standardize data collection, streamline data entry, and integrate these sectors in to one application.

Objective:

January 25, 2018

Disaster Surveillance: Perspectives from Federal, State, and Local levels

In this panel, the presenters will discuss their perspective in responding to Hurricanes Harvey and Irma. Hurricane Harvey made landfall on August 25th and over the course of 4 days dropped approximately 27 trillion gallons of water on Texas and Louisiana. The flooding that ensued was unprecedented and forced over 13,000 people into shelters. These individuals needed to have their basic needs -food, shelter, clothing, sanitation- met as well as their physical and mental health needs.

January 25, 2018

EpiCore: Crowdsourcing Health Professionals to Verify Disease Outbreaks

EpiCore draws on the knowledge of a global community of human, animal, and environmental health professionals to verify information on disease outbreaks in their geographic regions. By using innovative surveillance techniques and crowdsourcing these experts, EpiCore enables faster global outbreak detection, verification, and reporting

July 27, 2017

Evaluation of chlamydia and gonorrhea electronic provider reports data quality

Electronic case reporting (eCR) is defined as the fully or semiautomated generation and electronic transmission of reportable disease case reports from an electronic health record (EHR) system to public health authorities, replacing the historically paper-based process. ECR has been reported to increase the number, accuracy, completeness and timeliness of surveillance case reports.

July 27, 2017

Rapidly Adapting Flexible Surveillance Systems for Emergent Event Response

Georgia Department of Public Health (DPH) epidemiologists have responded to multiple emergent outbreaks with diverse surveillance needs. During the 2009 H1N1 influenza response, it was necessary to electronically integrate multiple reporting sources and view population-level data, while during the 2014–2015 West African Ebola epidemic, it was necessary to easily collect and view individual level data from travelers to facilitate early detection of potential imported Ebola disease.

August 03, 2017

Real-time surveillance and response system for Ebola and other emerging infections

Improving surveillance and response is a critical component of the Global Health Security Agenda. While it is impossible to predict where the next Ebola outbreak will occur, it is very likely that another outbreak will occur in the DRC. Of the 20 known outbreaks, 7 have occurred in the DRC, one as recently as 2014. To rapidly detect and respond to an Ebola outbreak, we sought to develop a real-time surveillance and response system for use in DRC and similar settings.

August 03, 2017

Advancing GHSA: Lessons learned about strengthening HIS and disease surveillance

RTI International has worked on enhancing health information and disease surveillance systems in many countries, including The Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Guinea, Indonesia, Kenya, Nepal, Philippines, Tanzania, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. Strengthening these systems is critical for all three of the Prevent, Detect and Respond domains within the Global Health Security Agenda. 

May 24, 2017

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