Enhanced Surveillance of Nonfatal Emergency Department Opioid Overdoses in California

The opioid epidemic is a multifaceted public health issue that requires a coordinated and dynamic response to address the ongoing changes in the trends of opioid overdoses. Access to timely and accurate data allows more targeted and effective programs and policies to prevent and reduce fatal and nonfatal drug overdoses in California.

June 18, 2019

EMS Heroin Overdoses with Refusal to Transport & Impacts on ED Overdose Surveillance

As a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Enhanced State Opioid Overdose Surveillance (ESOOS) funded state, Kentucky started utilizing Emergency Medical Services (EMS) data to increase timeliness of state data on drug overdose events in late 2016. Using developed definitions of heroin overdose for EMS emergency runs, Kentucky analyzed the patterns of refused/transported EMS runs for both statewide and local jurisdictions.

June 18, 2019

Assessing Prior Pain Visits and Medical History Risk Factors for Opioid Overdose

Opioid overdoses are a growing cause of mortality in the United States. Medical prescriptions for opioids are a risk factor for overdose. This observation raises concerns that patients may seek multiple opioid prescriptions, possibly increasing their overdose risk. One route for obtaining those prescriptions is visiting the emergency department (ED) for pain-related complaints. Here, two hypotheses related to prescription seeking and overdoses are tested. (1) Overdose patients have a larger number of prior ED visits than matched controls.

January 21, 2018

Heroin Overdose Hospitalization Risk due to Prescription Opioids using PDMP in WI.

Nationally and in Wisconsin, heroin is the leading cause of opioid related death and hospitalization. Opioids are commonly prescribed for pain. Every day, over 1,000 people are treated in emergency departments for misusing prescription opioids. In 2015, more than 15,000 people died from overdoses involving prescription opioids. Approximately, three out of four heroin users report having abused prescription opioids prior to using heroin. In Wisconsin from 2010 to 2014 the number of deaths involving any opioid increased by 51% and for heroin increased by 192%.

January 21, 2018

Opioid Misuse in Missouri: Analyzing Emergency Department Use in Urban/Rural Areas

Like many other states in the U.S., Missouri has experienced large increases in opioid abuse resulting in hundreds dying each year and thousands of ED visits due to overdose. Missouri has two major urban areas, St. Louis and Kansas City and a few smaller cities, while the remainder of the state is more rural in nature. The opioid epidemic has impacted all areas in the state but the magnitude of that impact varies as well as the type of opioid used.

January 21, 2018

Tracking suspected heroin overdoses in CDC's National Syndromic Surveillance Program

Overdose deaths involving opioids (i.e., opioid pain relievers and illicit opioids such as heroin) accounted for at least 63% (N = 33,091) of overdose deaths in 2015. Overdose deaths related to illicit opioids, heroin and illicitly-manufactured fentanyl, have rapidly increased since 2010. For instance, heroin overdose deaths quadrupled from 3,036 in 2010 to 12,989 in 2015. Unfortunately, timely response to emerging trends is inhibited by time lags for national data on both overdose mortality via vital statistics (8-12 months) and morbidity via hospital discharge data (over 2 years).

January 21, 2018

Leveraging City Data to Understand the Opioid Epidemic in Philadelphia

Philadelphia is in the midst of a drug epidemic that killed 702 Philadelphians in 2015, 907 in 2016, and is on trajectory to kill 1,200 in 2017. Opioids are involved in the majority of fatal overdoses, contributing to 80% of overdose deaths in 2016. In 2016, the age-adjusted death rate for opioid-involved overdoses was 40.4 deaths per 100,000 residents, up from 17.9 deaths per 100,000 residents in 2010.

January 25, 2018

Using Scan Statistic to Detect Heroin Overdose Clusters with Hospital Emergency Room Visit Data

Early detection of heroin overdose clusters is important in the current battle against the opioid crisis to effectively implement prevention and control measures. The New York State syndromic surveillance system collects hospital emergency department (ED) visit data, including visit time, chief complaint, and patient zip code. This data can be used to timely identify potential heroin overdose outbreaks by detecting spatial-temporal case clusters with scan statistic.

Objective:

January 25, 2018

Assessment of a Surveillance Case Definition for Heroin Overdose in Emergency Medical Services Data

In 2016, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention funded 12 states, under the Enhanced State Opioid Overdose Surveillance (ESOOS) program, to utilize state Emergency Medical Services (EMS) and emergency department (ED) syndromic surveillance (SyS) data systems to increase timeliness of state data on drug overdoses. A key aspect of the ESOOS program is the development and validation of case definitions for drug overdoses for EMS and ED SyS data systems.

January 25, 2018

Assessing Definitions of Heroin Overdose in ED & EMS Data Using Hospital Billing Data

In 2016, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention funded 12 states, under the Enhanced State Opioid Overdose Surveillance (ESOOS) program, to utilize state Emergency Medical Services (EMS) and emergency department syndromic surveillance (SyS) data systems to increase timeliness of state data on drug overdose events. An important component of the ESOOS program is the development and validation of case definitions for drug overdoses for EMS and ED SyS data systems with a focus on small area anomaly detection.

January 25, 2018

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