Monitoring winter-seasonal acute gastroenteritis emergency department visits by age

Epidemic acute gastroenteritis (AGE) is a major contributor to the global burden of morbidity and mortality. Rotavirus and norovirus epidemics present a significant burden annually, with their predominant impact in temperate climates occurring during winter periods. Annually, epidemic rotavirus causes an estimated 600,000 deaths worldwide, and 70,000 hospitalizations in the US, primarily among children <5 years of age. The US burden from norovirus is estimated at 71,000 hospitalizations annually, with the impact more generally across age groups.

May 02, 2019

Establishment of Public-access Syndromic Surveillance System in Taipei City, Taiwan

Taiwan had established a nation-wide emergency department (ED)-based syndromic surveillance system since 2004, with a mean detection sensitivity of 0.67 in 2004-06 [1]. However, this system may not represent the true epidemic situation of infectious disease in community, particularly those who don't seek medical care [2]. Moreover, the epidemiological settings, sources of the infection and social network all together may still facilitate the transmissions. These rooted problems cannot be rapidly solved.

Objective

This study has two specific aims:

May 02, 2019

Improvement of Epidemiology Business Processes through the Evolution of Biosurveillance

In the last decade, the scope of public health (PH) surveillance has grown, and biosurveillance capacity has expanded in Duval County. In 2004, the Duval County Health Department (DCHD) implemented a standalone syndromic surveillance (SS) system which required the manual classification and entry of emergency department (ED) chief complaints by hospital staff. At that time, this system, in conjunction with other external systems (e.g. CDC ILInet, FluStar, NRDM) were used to conduct surveillance for health events.

May 02, 2019

Adopting a common influenza-like illness syndrome across multiple health jurisdictions

Syndromic surveillance systems were designed for early outbreak and bioterrorism event detection. As practical experience shaped development and implementation, these systems became more broadly used for general surveillance and situational awareness, notably influenza-like illness (ILI) monitoring. Beginning in 2006, ISDS engaged partners from state and local health departments to build Distribute, a distributed surveillance network for sharing de-identified aggregate emergency department syndromic surveillance data through existing state and local public health systems.

May 02, 2019

Pandemic H1N1-Related ICU Rates According to Race/Ethnic Groups in Massachusetts

Unpublished statewide 2009 H1N1 epidemiological data suggests that rates of lab-confirmed H1N1-related hospitalization were three to four times higher in Black and Hispanic populations compared to White, non-Hispanic populations (Alfred DeMaria, MDPH, personal communication, 2010). There is an absence of socioeconomic data in most public health surveillance systems, and population-based statewide descriptions of H1N1-related hospitalizations according to race/ethnic group and SES have not been described.

Objective

May 02, 2019

November Literature Review: Epidemiology of influenza strains

Edward Goldstein, PhD, Harvard School of Public Health, Senior Research Scientist, Department of Epidemiology discusses his paper "Predicting the Epidemic Sizes of Influenza A/H1N1, A/H3N2, and B: A Statistical Method." Published in PLoS Med. 2011 Jul;8(7): e1001051.

Presenter

Edward Goldstein, PhD, Harvard School of Public Health

Date and Time

Tuesday, November 29, 2011

Host

ISDS Research Committee

October 18, 2017

Using Gaming Tools to Train Disease Surveillance Professionals and Investigate Next-Generation Capabilities

This webinar will provide an overview of game-based tools for surveillance training and technology evaluation. The philosophy and methods of “serious gaming” will be presented through case studies and interactive examples.

Panelists

Timothy Dasey, PhD, Group Leader, Chemical and Biological Defense Systems Group, MIT Lincoln Laboratories

Date and Time

Thursday, October 27, 2011

Host

ISDS Public Health Practice and Research Committees

October 20, 2017

Secrets of My Success (and Failures): Productive Practitioner/Researcher Collaboration

Two public health practitioners will describe their experiences collaborating with University researchers to develop and evaluate new informatics tools for public health. They will identify factors that led to the successes and failures in those collaborations.

Panelists

Joe Gibson, MPH, PhD, Director of Epidemiology - Marion County Public Health Department
Arthur Davidson, MD, MPH, Director of Public Health and Informatics - Denver Health

Date and Time

Friday, December 16, 2011

October 18, 2017

Epibasket: a prototype web tool aimed to speed up and standardize the epidemiological investigation of an outbreak

The detailed analysis of the epidemiological literature on the 2003 SARS epidemic published in peer reviewed journals has shown that a majority (78%) of the epidemiological articles were submitted after the epidemic had ended, although the

June 17, 2019

Use of Epidemiological Knowledge to Create Syndromic Surveillance Reports

Syndromic surveillance is an investigational approach used to monitor trends of illness in communities. It relies on pre-diagnostic health data rather than laboratory-confirmed clinical diagnoses. Its primary purpose is to detect disease outbreaks, incidents and unusual public health events earlier than possible with traditional public health surveillance methods.

 

Objective

July 30, 2018

Pages

Contact Us

NSSP Community of Practice

Email: syndromic@cste.org

 

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