Justification for Collecting Urgent Care Data to Broaden Syndromic Surveillance

While UC does not have a standard definition, it can generally be described as the delivery of ambulatory medical care outside of a hospital emergency department (ED) on a walk-in basis, without a scheduled appointment, available at extended hours, and providing an array of services comparable to typical primary care offices. UC facilities represent a growing sector of the United States healthcare industry, doubling in size between 2008 and 2011. The Urgent Care Association of America (UCAOA) estimates that UC facilities had 160 million patient encounters in 2013.

January 19, 2018

Syndromic Surveillance – Reports of Successes from the Field

Syndromic surveillance uses near-real-time emergency department and other health care data for enhancing public health situational awareness and informing public health activities. In recent years, continued progress has been made in developing and strengthening syndromic surveillance activities.

January 21, 2018

Syndromic Surveillance Analysis & Interpretation

Presented January 31, 2018

 

David Swenson presented the following slides during the 2018 ISDS Annual Conference in Orlando, Florida. This presentation provides a use case for developing and implementing surveillance prodocols to conduct public health monitoring, analyze data collected, and engage partners/leadership in follow-up procedures.

 

Presenter: David Swenson, AHEDD Project Manager, Infectious Disease Surveillance Section DPHS, DHHS, New Hampshire

January 26, 2019

Urgent Care Data...should we collect, how, and why?

More and more patients frequent Urgent Care facilites. In this webinar, we will discuss how NSSP jurisdictions collect it, how is it formatted, and what have they learned; what's the best way to capture and share this information; and why should we collect and report this data.

Presenters

David Swenson, AHEDD Project Manager, New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Services, Division of Public Health Services, Communicable Disease Surveillance Section

February 24, 2017

Review of the 2016 ISDS Annual Conference: Continuing the Momentum

ISDS is kicking off the year with a webinar to review highlights from the 2016 Annual Conference in Atlanta, GA. If you attended the conference, we invite you to come share and learn more about initiatives sprung from the conference, and to discuss how best to continue moving them ahead. If you were unable to attend the conference, please join us to hear from our Conference Chairs about session highlights and key takeaways. We will also be discussing post-conference evaluation findings and informally collecting feedback for next year's conference.

Presenters

March 15, 2017

New Master Mapping Reference Table (MMRT) to Assist ICD-10 Transition for Syndromic Surveillance

As of October 1, 2015, all HIPAA covered entities transition from the use of International Classification of Diseases version 9 (ICD-9-CM) to version 10 (ICD-10-CM/PCS). Many Public Health surveillance entities receive, interpret, analyze, and report ICD-9 encoded data, which will all be significantly impacted by the transition. Public health agencies will need to modify existing database structures, extraction rules, and messaging guides, as well as revise established syndromic surveillance definitions and underlying analytic and business rules to accommodate this transition.

September 01, 2017

Preliminary Look into the ICD9/10 Transition Impact on Public Health Surveillance

On October 1, 2015, the number of ICD codes will expand from 14,000 in version 9 to 68,000 in version 10. The new code set will increase the specificity of reporting, allowing more information to be conveyed in a single code. It is anticipated that the conversion will have a significant impact on public health surveillance by enhancing the capture of reportable diseases, injuries, and conditions of public health importance that have traditionally been the target of syndromic surveillance monitoring.

September 07, 2017

Preparing for the Impact of the ICD-9/10 Transition on Syndromic Surveillance

The US Department of Health and Human Services has mandated that after October 1, 2015, all HIPAA covered entities must transition from using International Classification of Diseases version 9 (ICD- 9) codes to using version 10 (ICD-10) codes (www.cms.gov). This will impact public health surveillance entities that receive, analyze, and report ICD-9 encoded data.

November 17, 2017

Planning for the ICD-10 Transition

The transition of all HIPAA covered entities from the use of ICD­9­CM to ICD­10­CM/PCS codes on October 1, 2015 will create a paradigm change in the use of electronic health record (EHR) data. Many public health surveillance entities that receive, interpret, analyze, and report ICD­9 encoded data will be significantly impacted by the transition. Is your jurisdiction ready? Do you have a plan in place?

June 21, 2017

Check! Explore Barriers and Solutions to Data Sharing on BioSense 2.0

Inter-jurisdictional data sharing can enhance disease surveillance capabilities for local, state, regional and national public health situational awareness and response. BioSense 2.0, a cloud-based computing platform for syndromic surveillance, provides participating local, state and federal health jurisdictions with the ability to share aggregated data; a functionality that is easily activated by selecting an administrative checkbox within the BioSense application. Checking the data-sharing box, however, is a considerable decision that comes with benefits and consequences.

August 22, 2018

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