Using State and National Surveillance Systems during World Equestrian Games in NC

North Carolina hosted the 2018 FEI WEG in Polk County at the Tryon Equestrian Center in September 2018. Polk County, located in the Mountain region of Western North Carolina, is home to 20,357 people, and the population is widely distributed. Event organizers expected approximately 300,000 to 500,000 people to visit the area, with 800 horses from 71 countries taking part in the games. Providing adequate public health epidemiologic investigations and response for the large scale event in the predominantly rural area presented a challenge.

June 18, 2019

Poison Control Center Data in the NC DETECT Syndromic Surveillance System.

CPC provides the 24/7/365 poison hotline for the entire state of North Carolina and currently handles approximately 80,000 calls per year. CPC consultation services that assist callers with poison exposure, diagnosis, optimal patient management, therapy, and patient disposition guidance remain indispensable to the public and health care providers. Poison control center data have been used for years in syndromic surveillance practice as a reliable data source for early event detection.

August 03, 2017

Using Syndromic Surveillance Data to Monitor Endocarditis and Sepsis among Drug Users

Recreational drug use is a major problem in the United States and around the world. Specifically, drug abuse results in heavy use of emergency department (ED) services, and is a high financial burden to society and to the hospitals due to chronic ill health and multiple injection drug use complications. Intravenous drug users are at high risk of developing sepsis and endocarditis due to the use of a dirty or infected needle that is either shared with someone else or re-used.

August 26, 2017

Triage Notes in Syndromic Surveillance – A Double Edged Sword

The advent of Meaningful Use (MU) has allowed for the expansion of data collected at the hospital level and received by public health for syndromic surveillance. The triage note, a free text expansion on the chief complaint, is one of the many variables that are becoming commonplace in syndromic surveillance data feeds. Triage notes are readily available in many ED information systems, including, but not limited to, Allscripts, Cerner, EPIC, HMS, MedHost, Meditech, and T-System.

September 20, 2017

Assessing the Potential Impact of the BioSense 24-hour Rule Using NC DETECT ED Data

Per a frequently asked questions document on the ISDS website, approximately two thirds of HL7 records received in BioSense do not provide a Visit ID. As a result, BioSense data processing rules use the patient ID, facility ID and earliest date in the record to identify a unique visit. If the earliest dates in records with the same patient ID and facility ID occur within the same 24-hour time frame, those two visits are combined into one visit and the earliest date will be stored.

September 28, 2017

Identifying Emerging Novel Outbreaks In Textual Emergency Department Data

Typical approaches to monitoring ED data classify cases into pre-defined syndromes and then monitor syndrome counts for anomalies. However, syndromes cannot be created to identify every possible cluster of cases of relevance to public health. To address this limitation, NC DETECT’s approach clusters cases by arrival times and monitors the textual chief complaint data associated with each identified cluster for relevant similarities [1]. This approach is time consuming and limited in its ability to detect emerging outbreaks that are dispersed across time.

November 01, 2017

Using NC DETECT for Comprehensive Morbidity Surveillance on Poisoning and Overdose

A retrospective analysis of emergency department data in NC for drug and opioid overdoses has been explained previously [1]. We built on this initial work to develop new poisoning and surveillance reports to facilitate near real time surveillance by health department and hospital users. In North Carolina, the availability for mortality and hospital discharge data are approximately one and two years after the event date, respectively.

December 20, 2017

Adapting Syndromic Surveillance Systems to Increase Value to Local Health Departments

Syndromic surveillance systems offer richer understanding of population health. However, because of their complexity, they are less used at small public health agencies, such as many local health departments (LHDs). The evolution of these systems has included modifying user interfaces for more efficient and effective use at the local level. The North Carolina Preparedness and Emergency Response Research Center previously evaluated use of syndromic surveillance information at LHDs in North Carolina.

January 24, 2018

Enhanced Surveillance during the Democratic National Convention, Charlotte, NC

North Carolina hosted the 2012 Democratic National Convention, September 3-6, 2012. The NC Epidemiology and Surveillance Team was created to facilitate enhanced surveillance for injuries and illnesses, early detection of outbreaks during the DNC, assist local public health with epidemiologic investigations and response, and produce daily surveillance reports for internal and external stakeholders.

March 19, 2018

Time of Arrival Analysis in NC DETECT to Find Clusters of Interest from Unclassified Patient Visit Records

TOA identifies clusters of patients arriving to a hospital ED within a short temporal interval. Past implementations have been restricted to records of patients with a specific type of complaint. The Florida Department of Health uses TOA at the county level for multiple subsyndromes (1). In 2011, NC DPH, CCHI and CDC collaborated to enhance and evaluate this capability for NC DETECT, using NC DETECT data in BioSense 1.0 (2).

August 20, 2018

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