Analytic Fusion for Essential Indicators of the Opioid Epidemic

Unlike other health threats of recent concern for which widespread mortality was hypothetical, the high fatality burden of opioid overdose crisis is present, steadily growing, and affecting young and old, rural and urban, military and civilian subpopulations. While the background of many public health monitors is mainly infectious disease surveillance, these epidemiologists seek to collaborate with behavioral health and injury prevention programs and with law enforcement and emergency medical services to combat the opioid crisis.

June 18, 2019

Poison center data for public health surveillance: Poison center and public health perspectives

Since 2008, poisoning is the leading cause of injury-related death in the United States; since 1980, the poisoning-related fatality rate in the United States (U.S.) has almost tripled. Many poison-related injuries and deaths are reported to regional PCs which receive about 2.4 million reports of human chemical and poison exposures annually. Federal, state, and local PH agencies often collaborate with PCs and use PC data for PH surveillance to identify poisoning-related health issues.

January 21, 2018

Public Health Surveillance for the Great American Solar Eclipse in Oregon

The Great American Solar Eclipse of 2017 provided a rare opportunity to view a complete solar eclipse on the American mainland. Much of Oregon was in the path of totality and forecasted to have clear skies. Ahead of the event, OPHD aggregated a list of 107 known gatherings in mostly rural areas across the state, some with estimated attendance of up to 30,000 attendees. Temporary food vendors and a range of sanitation solutions (including open latrines) were planned. International travelers were expected, along with large numbers of visitors traveling by car on the day of the eclipse.

January 25, 2018

Improving Syndromic Data Quality through Implementation of Error Capture Module

Oregon Public Health Division (OPHD), in collaboration with The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, implemented Oregon ESSENCE in 2011. ESSENCE is an automated, electronic syndromic surveillance system that captures emergency department data from hospitals across Oregon. While each hospital system sends HL7 2.5.1-formatted messages, each uses a uniquely configured interface to capture, extract, and send data. Consequently, ESSENCE receives messages that vary greatly in content and structure.

January 25, 2018

ED and poison center surveillance for the Great American Solar Eclipse in Oregon

Oregon’s statewide syndromic surveillance system (Oregon ESSENCE) has been operational since 2012. Non-federal emergency department data (and several of their associated urgent care centers) are the primary source for the system, although other data sources have been added, including de-identified call data from OPC in 2016. OPHD epidemiologists have experience monitoring mass gatherings and have a strong relationship with OPC, collaborating on a regular basis for routine and heightened public health surveillance.

January 25, 2018

Oregon Poison Center and Oregon Public Health Division Monitoring for the 2017 Solar Eclipse

Presented November 31, 2017 by the Oregon Poison Center and Oregon Public Health Division Monitoring.

Presenters:

Sandy Giffin, RN, MS, Director, Oregon Poison Center

Laurel Boyd, MPH, ESSENCE Epidemiologist, Oregon Public Health Division

December 01, 2017

Mass Gathering Surveillance: New ESSENCE Report and Collaboration Win Gold in OR

The 2016 U.S. Olympic Track and Field Team Trials were held July 1-10 in Eugene, OR. This mass gathering included over 1,000 athletes, 1,500 volunteers, and 175,000 spectators. The Oregon Public Health Division (PHD) and Lane County Public Health (LCPH) participated in pre-event planning and collaborated to produce a daily epidemiology report for the Incident Management Team (IMT) during the event. The state and county public health agencies had collaborated on surveillance for prior mass gatherings, including the 2012 Trials.

July 16, 2017

Streamling Syndromic Surveillance Submission on a Dime: Oregon’s Experience

In 2012, the Oregon Public Health Division (OPHD) took advantage of the opportunity created by Meaningful Use, a Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) Incentive Program, to implement statewide syndromic surveillance. The Oregon syndromic surveillance project, or Oregon ESSENCE, began accepting MUcompliant HL7 2.5.1 data in late 2013. Early onboarding efforts were labor-intensive and led to the creation of a testing queue.

August 10, 2017

Tracking Health Effects of Wildfires: The Oregon ESSENCE Wildfire Pilot Project

Wildfires occur annually in Oregon, and the health risks of wildfire smoke are well documented1. Before implementing syndromic surveillance through Oregon ESSENCE, assessing the health effects of wildfires in real time was very challenging. Summer 2015 marked the first wildfire season with 60 of 60 eligible Oregon emergency departments (EDs) reporting to ESSENCE.

August 20, 2017

National Syndromic Surveillance Program (NSSP) BioSense Onboarding Workgroup - Report

Objective

To share best practices for onboarding amongst community members in the interest of improving onboarding efforts nationally.

October 29, 2017

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Contact Us

NSSP Community of Practice

Email: syndromic@cste.org

 

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