Using administrative databases to identify cases of chronic kidney disease: a systematic review

Description: 

CKD is currently the ninth leading cause of death in the United States. The prevalence of end-stage renal disease, the most severe form of CKD, has doubled in the last decade.1 Early detection and treatment of CKD is critical to slowdown the progression of the disease and to decrease the risk of other chronic conditions, such as cardiovascular disease.2 One accessible and cost-effective method for health research activities involves use of medical administrative databases, such as insurance claims databases and institutional medical record systems. Individuals with diabetes, for example, have been accurately identified in Medicare and Veterans’ Health Administration databases using clearly defined and highly valid search algorithms.3 However, little is known about the validity of administrative databases for identifying CKD. A systematic review of the literature was conducted to identify the validity of published methods for searching administrative databases for cases of CKD.

Objective

This poster summarizes a systematic literature conducted to (1) describe published methods for researching chronic kidney disease (CKD) in administrative databases and (2) summarize the reported validity of methods of searching for CKD in administrative databases.

Primary Topic Areas: 
Original Publication Year: 
2010
Event/Publication Date: 
December, 2010

June 25, 2019

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