Comparing Syndromic Data to Discharge Data to Measure Opioid Overdose Emergency Department Visits

Timely and accurate measurement of overdose morbidity using emergency department (ED) data is necessary to inform an effective public health response given the dynamic nature of opioid overdose epidemic in the United States. However, from jurisdiction to jurisdiction, differing sources and types of ED data vary in their quality and comprehensiveness. Many jurisdictions collect timely emergency department data through syndromic surveillance (SyS) systems, while others may have access to more complete, but slower emergency department discharge datasets.

June 18, 2019

New technologies to treatment of Spotted Fever, GVE VII - Santo Andre, SP, Brazil.

The use of new technologies such as Online Maps and the QR Code facilitates the knowledge dissemination in the health science, aiding in diagnostic elucidation and intelligent decisions making, thus offering an improvement in the quality of care provided to patients. Cases with suspected spotted fever should be approached as potentially serious, which may develop with shock within a few hours and, if not addressed can progress to death. In the case of spotted fever, early onset determines the cure of these cases.

June 18, 2019

Improving Varicella Investigation Completeness in Pennsylvania

Routine childhood administration of varicella-containing vaccine has resulted in the number of varicella (chickenpox) cases in Pennsylvania falling from nearly 3,000 cases in 2007 to less than 400 cases in 2017. Prior to 2018, the completeness of varicella case investigation data documented in Pennsylvania's electronic disease surveillance system (PA-NEDSS) was not routinely monitored by Department of Health (DOH) staff. A pilot project was initiated in April 2018 to monitor and improve completeness of select varicella case investigation variables.

June 18, 2019

Tracking environmental hazards and health outcomes to inform decision-making in the United States

In 2002, the United States (US) Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) launched the National Environmental Public Health Tracking Program (Tracking Program) to address the challenges in environmental health surveillance described by the Pew Environmental Commission (1). The report cited gaps in our understanding of how the environment affects our health and attributed these gaps to a dearth of surveillance data for environmental hazards, human exposures, and health effects.

June 18, 2019

Field-based Evaluation of Malaria Outbreak Detection & Response, Mudzi and Goromonzi

Infectious disease outbreaks, such as the Ebola outbreak in West Africa, highlight the need for surveillance systems to quickly detect outbreaks and provide data to prevent future pandemics. The World Health Organization (WHO) developed the Joint External Evaluation (JEE) tool to conduct country-level assessments of surveillance capacity. However, considering that outbreaks begin and are first detected at the local level, national-level evaluations may fail to identify capacity improvements for outbreak detection.

June 18, 2019

Validating Syndromic Data for Opioid Overdose Surveillance in Florida

In 2017, FL Department of Health (DOH) became one of thirty-two states plus Washington, D.C funded by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) under the ESOOS program. One of the objectives of this funding was to increase the timeliness of reporting on non-fatal opioid overdoses through syndromic surveillance utilizing either the emergency department (ED) or Emergency Medical Services (EMS) data systems. Syndromic case validation is an essential requirement under ESOOS for non-fatal opioid-involved overdose (OIOD).

June 18, 2019

Sustainable Development Goal 3.6 and road traffic injury surveillance, Nigeria West Africa,2013 - 2016

Globally, road traffic crashes (RTCs) annually kill 1.3 million people and injure 20-50 million others. Nigeria accounts for an estimated 15% of RTC deaths in the WHO African Region.

Objective: This study aimed to describe RTC characteristics and trends in Nigeria and determine progress towards halving RTC-related deaths/injuries by 2020 [i.e., Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) Target 3.6].

June 18, 2019

Evaluation of REDCap to Supplement Foodborne Disease Surveillance Systems

The Tennessee Department of Health (TDH) Foodborne Disease Program conducts routine surveillance for foodborne illnesses and enteric disease outbreaks and participates in statewide enhanced surveillance as part of the Foodborne Disease Center for Outbreak Response Enhancement (FoodCORE) and the Foodborne Diseases Active Surveillance Network (FoodNet) supported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). TDH uses the CDC NEDSS Base System (NBS) application for routine disease surveillance.

June 18, 2019

C. burnetii Shedding Study In Domestic Animals in Georgia

Q fever is a zoonotic bacterial disease resulting from infection by Coxiella burnetii. Domestic ruminants (cattle, sheep, and goats) are considered the main reservoir for the pathogen, which can also infect humans. Q fever is poorly understood in Georgia and its prevalence is largely underestimated in both humans and animals. In Georgia Q fever laboratory diagnostic was started and implemented at the Laboratory of the Ministry of Georgia (LMA) within GG20 "Prevalence, Epidemiological Surveillance, and Laboratory Analysis of Coxiella burnetii in Georgia.

June 18, 2019

Prevalence of Hepatitis C Testing Among Non-Institutionalized Individuals in the US, NHIS 2013-2017

Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is the most common blood-borne disease in the US and the leading cause of liver-related morbidity and mortality. Approximately 3.5 million individuals in the US were estimated to have been living with hepatitis C in 2010 and approximately half of them were unaware that they were infected. Among HCV infected individuals, those born between 1945 and 1965 (usually referred to as the baby boomer cohort) represents approximately 75% of current cases.

June 18, 2019

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