Enhancing TX SyS by integrating EMS and Poison Data for Opioid Overdose Surveillance

In recent years, the number of deaths from illicit and prescription opioids has increased significantly resulting in a national and local public health crisis. According to the Texas Center for Health Statistics, there were 1340 opioid related deaths in 2015.1 In 2005, by comparison, there were 913 opioid related deaths. Syndromic surveillance can be used to monitor overdose trends in near real-time and provide much needed information to public health officials.

June 18, 2019

Methanol Ingestions: Public Health and Poison Center Response - Tennessee

Poison Control Center and Public Health Community of Practice webinar held August 31, 2017. Presentation by the Tennessee Department of Health and Poison Center

September 07, 2017

Evaluation of Exposure-Type Stratification to Improve Poison Center Surveillance

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) uses the National Poison Data System (NPDS) to conduct surveillance of calls to United States poison centers (PCs) to identify clusters of reports of hazardous exposures and illnesses. NPDS stores basic information from PC calls including call type (information request only or call reporting a possible chemical exposure), exposure agent, demographics, clinical, and other variables.

June 11, 2017

Improving Detection of Call Clusters through Surveillance of Poison Center Data

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) uses the National Poison Data System (NPDS) to conduct surveillance of calls to United States PCs. PCs provide triage and treatment advice for hazardous exposures through a free national hotline. Information on demographics, health effects, implicated substance(s), medical outcome of the patient, and other variables are collected.

July 06, 2017

Integrating Poison Center Data into Oregon ESSENCE using a Low-Cost Solution

Oregon Public Health Division (OPHD), in collaboration with the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, implemented Oregon ESSENCE in 2012. Oregon ESSENCE is an automated, electronic syndromic surveillance system that captures emergency department data. To strengthen the capabilities of Oregon ESSENCE, OPHD sought other sources of health-outcome information, including Oregon Poison Center (OPC). In the past, Oregon’s surveillance staff manually monitored OPC data on the National Poison Data Service (NPDS) website.

July 10, 2017

Poison Control Center Data in the NC DETECT Syndromic Surveillance System.

CPC provides the 24/7/365 poison hotline for the entire state of North Carolina and currently handles approximately 80,000 calls per year. CPC consultation services that assist callers with poison exposure, diagnosis, optimal patient management, therapy, and patient disposition guidance remain indispensable to the public and health care providers. Poison control center data have been used for years in syndromic surveillance practice as a reliable data source for early event detection.

August 03, 2017

Development of the Arkansas (AR) Poison Control Center (PCC) Mission Ready Package to Support Continuity of Operations and Surge Utilizing the Emergency Management Assistance Compact (EMAC)

This presentation will describe how Arkansas used the EMAC to address surge capacity needs during emergency response. The presentation will describe 1) how existing AR PCC, ADH, and ADEM partnerships used the EMAC Mission Ready Package (MRP) system to address surge capacity, and 2) the MRP development process as well as the activation procedures and integration of the AR PCC into the state’s response process

Presenters: 

Dr. Howell Foster, Director, AR PCC, University of AR for Medical Sciences 

April 10, 2017

CDC June 2016 Community of Practice Webinar Recording

Drs. Arens, Vo, van Wijk, and Coffin will present a cluster of opioid-related poisoning cases and deaths in San Francisco following ingestion of counterfeit pills designed to look like prescription medication. They will describe the clinical cases and detailed the coordinated public health response, which included the local PCC, a toxicology lab, a public health officer, the local medical examiner, and affected hospitals.

Presenters:

Ann Arens, MD and Kathy Vo, MD, Medical Toxicology Fellows, California Poison Control System, San Francisco Division 

April 10, 2017

Using Syndromic Surveillance to Identify Synthetic Cannabinoids or Marijuana Adverse Health Events in Virginia

SCRAs are accessible and affordable, sold online, in gas stations, and in “head” shops for $5-30 per package.[1] While marijuana is a schedule 1 narcotic, unavailable for any use, SCRAs navigate the legal landscape with marketing as non-consumable and frequent modifications to the active ingredients that outpace lawmakers’ updates. When consumed, SCRAs bind the same receptor as the active ingredient in marijuana with 10-1000 times the affinity.

September 25, 2017

Increase in Adverse Health Effects Related to Synthetic Cannabinoid Use

Synthetic cannabinoids include various psychoactive chemicals that are sprayed onto plant material, which is then smoked or ingested to achieve a “high.” These products are sold under a variety of names (e.g., synthetic marijuana, spice, K2, black mamba, and crazy clown) and are sold in retail outlets as herbal products and are often labeled not for human consumption. Law enforcement agencies regulate many of these substances; however, manufacturers may frequently change the formulation and mask their intended purpose to avoid detection and regulation.

October 10, 2017

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