Drug Overdose Trends among Black Indiana Residents: 2013-2017

Black Hoosiers, the largest minority population in Indiana, make up almost 10% of the state's population, and accounted for 8% of the total resident drug overdose deaths from 2013-2017 compared to whites at 91%. However, a closer look at race-specific mortality rates might reveal racial inequalities. Therefore, the purpose of this project was to analyze drug overdose morality rates among white and black Hoosiers to discover possible racial inequalities and to discover trends in drug involvement in overdose deaths among blacks.

June 18, 2019

An Assessment of Overdose Surveillance at a Local Public Health Department

Mirroring public health response to infectious disease outbreaks, many public health departments are taking an outbreak management approach to respond to drug overdose surges 1-3. The Marion County Public Health Department (MCPHD) has developed an overdose response plan (ORP) integrating drug overdose surveillance and community stakeholder response strategies. Effective drug overdose surveillance requires accurate and reliable data streams. This work assessed data sources utilized for county overdose surveillance and provided recommendations to improve overdose surveillance.

June 18, 2019

Using the CA Opioid Overdose Surveillance Dashboard to track opioid overdose deaths

California continues to face a serious public health crisis with the opioid epidemic having substantial health and economic impacts. The epidemic is dynamic and rapidly changing, involving both prescription opioids influenced by prescribing and dispensing patterns as well as illicit opioids influenced by the availability of heroin and recently, the increased availability of fentanyl. The complexity of the issue necessitates data-informed actions through multi-sector, strategic collaboration at both the state and local levels to address the problem comprehensively.

June 18, 2019

Comparing Syndromic Data to Discharge Data to Measure Opioid Overdose Emergency Department Visits

Timely and accurate measurement of overdose morbidity using emergency department (ED) data is necessary to inform an effective public health response given the dynamic nature of opioid overdose epidemic in the United States. However, from jurisdiction to jurisdiction, differing sources and types of ED data vary in their quality and comprehensiveness. Many jurisdictions collect timely emergency department data through syndromic surveillance (SyS) systems, while others may have access to more complete, but slower emergency department discharge datasets.

June 18, 2019

Virtual Speed Networking with the Analytic Solutions Committee (ASC)

Presented January 11, 2018.

The purpose of the event was to stimulate and facilitate constructive communication and collaboration among analytic method developers and practitioners charged with routine public health surveillance, ranging from disease outbreak surveillance to chronic disease burden assessment and disaster response.

January 11, 2018

Assessing Prior Pain Visits and Medical History Risk Factors for Opioid Overdose

Opioid overdoses are a growing cause of mortality in the United States. Medical prescriptions for opioids are a risk factor for overdose. This observation raises concerns that patients may seek multiple opioid prescriptions, possibly increasing their overdose risk. One route for obtaining those prescriptions is visiting the emergency department (ED) for pain-related complaints. Here, two hypotheses related to prescription seeking and overdoses are tested. (1) Overdose patients have a larger number of prior ED visits than matched controls.

January 21, 2018

Heroin Overdose Hospitalization Risk due to Prescription Opioids using PDMP in WI.

Nationally and in Wisconsin, heroin is the leading cause of opioid related death and hospitalization. Opioids are commonly prescribed for pain. Every day, over 1,000 people are treated in emergency departments for misusing prescription opioids. In 2015, more than 15,000 people died from overdoses involving prescription opioids. Approximately, three out of four heroin users report having abused prescription opioids prior to using heroin. In Wisconsin from 2010 to 2014 the number of deaths involving any opioid increased by 51% and for heroin increased by 192%.

January 21, 2018

Leveraging City Data to Understand the Opioid Epidemic in Philadelphia

Philadelphia is in the midst of a drug epidemic that killed 702 Philadelphians in 2015, 907 in 2016, and is on trajectory to kill 1,200 in 2017. Opioids are involved in the majority of fatal overdoses, contributing to 80% of overdose deaths in 2016. In 2016, the age-adjusted death rate for opioid-involved overdoses was 40.4 deaths per 100,000 residents, up from 17.9 deaths per 100,000 residents in 2010.

January 25, 2018

Tracking drug-related overdoses at the local level: Using Syndromic Surveillance in the CO-NCR

The United States is in the midst of a drug crisis; drug-related overdoses are the leading cause of unintentional death in the country. In Colorado the rate of fatal drug overdose increased 68% from 2002-2014 (9.7 deaths per 100,000 to 16.3 per 100,000, respectively), and non-fatal overdose also increased during this time period (23% increase in emergency department visits since 2011).

January 25, 2018

Using Scan Statistic to Detect Heroin Overdose Clusters with Hospital Emergency Room Visit Data

Early detection of heroin overdose clusters is important in the current battle against the opioid crisis to effectively implement prevention and control measures. The New York State syndromic surveillance system collects hospital emergency department (ED) visit data, including visit time, chief complaint, and patient zip code. This data can be used to timely identify potential heroin overdose outbreaks by detecting spatial-temporal case clusters with scan statistic.

Objective:

January 25, 2018

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