Using State and National Surveillance Systems during World Equestrian Games in NC

North Carolina hosted the 2018 FEI WEG in Polk County at the Tryon Equestrian Center in September 2018. Polk County, located in the Mountain region of Western North Carolina, is home to 20,357 people, and the population is widely distributed. Event organizers expected approximately 300,000 to 500,000 people to visit the area, with 800 horses from 71 countries taking part in the games. Providing adequate public health epidemiologic investigations and response for the large scale event in the predominantly rural area presented a challenge.

June 18, 2019

Identifying Emergency Department Care in the Year Prior to Suicide Death

Suicide is a leading cause of mortality in the United States, causing about 45,000 deaths annually. Research suggests that universal screening in health care settings may be beneficial for prevention, but few studies have combined detailed suicide circumstances with ED encounter data to better understand care-seeking behavior prior to death.

Objective: To identify potential emergency department (ED) visits prior to suicide deaths in North Carolina (NC) and describe pre-suicide care-seeking in EDs.

June 18, 2019

Evaluation of Pedestrian/Bicycle Crash Injury Case Definitions for Use with NC DETECT

Over the last few decades, the United States has made considerable progress in decreasing the incidence of motor vehicle occupants injured and killed in traffic collisions.1 However, there is still a need for continued motor vehicle crash (MVC) injury surveillance, particularly for vulnerable road users, such as pedestrians and bicyclists.

June 18, 2019

Use of Syndromic Data to Determine Oral Health Visit Burden on Emergency Departments

Concern over oral health-related ED visits stems from the increasing number of unemployed and uninsured, the cost burden of these visits, and the unavailability of indicated dental care in EDs [1]. Of particular interest to NC state public health planners are Medicaid-covered visits. Syndromic data in biosurveillance systems offer a means to quantify these visits overall and by county and age group.

Objective

July 06, 2018

Securing protected health information in NC DETECT

NC DETECT receives daily data files from emergency departments (ED), the statewide EMS data collection system, the statewide poison center, and veterinary laboratory test results. Included in these data are elements, which may contain Protected Health Information (PHI). It is the responsibility of NC DETECT to ensure that security of these data is managed during their entire life cycle, including receiving, loading, cleaning, storage, managing, reporting, user access, archiving, and destruction.

June 25, 2019

Infection Control Practitioner Use of NC DETECT

The UNC Department of Emergency Medicine (UNC DEM) conducted an online survey to better understand the surveillance needs of Infection Control Practitioners (ICPs) in North Carolina and solicit feedback on the utility of the North Carolina Disease Event Tracking and Epidemiologic Collection Tool (NC DETECT).

July 30, 2018

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Email: syndromic@cste.org

 

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