Disease Surveillance among Katrina Evacuees in Shelters - Use of a Web-Based Surveillance System during an Emergency Response

On Monday, August 29, 2005, Hurricane Katrina struck the Gulf Coast. Outside of the affected areas of TX, LA, MS, and AL, GA received the largest number of these evacuees, approximately 125,000. By August 30, 2005, GA began receiving a total of approximately 1,300 NDMS patients from flights arriving at Dobbins Air Force Base. Within days, Georgia established 13 shelters for evacuees. Crowded shelters can increase the risk for communicable diseases. In addition, many evacuees left behind needed medications, thus increasing the risk for chronic disease exacerbations.

 

July 30, 2018

Post-Katrina Situational Awareness in North Carolina

The North Carolina Disease Event Tracking and Epidemiologic Collection Tool (NC DETECT) is the early event detection system that serves public health users across North Carolina. One important data source for this system is North Carolina emergency department visits. ED data from hospitals across the state are downloaded, standardized, aggregated, and updated twice daily.

July 30, 2018

Syndromic Surveillance of Emergency Department Chief Complaints Post-Hurricane Wilma, Broward County, Florida 2005

On October 24, 2005, Hurricane Wilma made landfall on the southwest coast of Florida as a category 3 storm. The storm moved toward the northeast and passed through Palm Beach and Broward Counties before entering the Atlantic Ocean. Hurricane force winds and rain caused extensive damage to electrical infrastructure and traffic lights, and temporarily displaced thousands of residents. Power outages in Broward County affected over 90% of its 1.8 million residents, with some outages lasting >2 weeks. Boil water notices were declared for much of the county.

July 30, 2018

Syndromic Surveillance Shows Medical Surge in Dallas–Fort Worth during Hurricane Harvey, 2017

Hurricane Harvey made landfall in Texas on August 25, 2017, resulting in 88 fatalities and more than $125 billion in damages to infrastructure. In Houston, flooding created a toxic mix of chemicals, sewage, biohazards, and 8 million cubic yards of garbage. The level of biohazard exposure, as well as injuries from trauma among persons residing in affected areas, was widespread and likely contributed to increases in emergency department (ED) visits in Houston and cities that received persons evacuating from the hurricane.

November 29, 2018

Monitoring Population Changes for Emergency Management Support in Tennessee

In late summer 2017, the United States endured two severe hurricanes back to back. On August 25, 2017, Hurricane Harvey made landfall in Texas and southwest Louisiana, dumping more than 19 trillion gallons of rain. On September 10, 2017, 20 days later, Hurricane Irma landed in Florida, leading residents across the Florida peninsula to evacuate inland and out of the path of the storm. Although Tennessee was far from the eye of the storms, state health officials knew residents from both states could choose to shelter in Tennessee.

February 27, 2018

Pages

Contact Us

NSSP Community of Practice

Email: syndromic@cste.org

 

This website is supported by Cooperative Agreement # 6NU38OT000297-02-01 Strengthening Public Health Systems and Services through National Partnerships to Improve and Protect the Nation's Health between the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists. Its contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of CDC. CDC is not responsible for Section 508 compliance (accessibility) on private websites.

Site created by Fusani Applications