Recommendations for Surveillance of EMS Data for Opioid Overdoses

Presented March 21, 2019.

FirstWatch Recommendations for Surveillance of EMS Data for Opioid Overdoses: https://www.firstwatch.net/finding-opioid-data/

March 29, 2019

EMS Heroin Overdoses with Refusal to Transport & Impacts on ED Overdose Surveillance

As a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Enhanced State Opioid Overdose Surveillance (ESOOS) funded state, Kentucky started utilizing Emergency Medical Services (EMS) data to increase timeliness of state data on drug overdose events in late 2016. Using developed definitions of heroin overdose for EMS emergency runs, Kentucky analyzed the patterns of refused/transported EMS runs for both statewide and local jurisdictions.

June 18, 2019

Linking Emergency Medical Service Data to Death Records for Opioid Mortality Surveillance

Opioid abuse has increased exponentially in recent years throughout the United States, leading to an increase in the incidence of emergency response activities, hospitalization, and mortality related to opioid overdose.

June 18, 2019

Development of Text-Based Algorithm for Opioid Overdose Identification in EMS Data

Opioid overdoses have emerged within the last five to ten years to be a major public health concern. The high potential for fatal events, disease transmission, and addiction all contribute to negative outcomes. However, what is currently known about opioid use and overdose is generally gathered from emergency room data, public surveys, and mortality data. In addition, opioid overdoses are a non-reportable condition.

June 18, 2019

Identification of Clinical Indicators of Opioid Overdose using innovative EMS software analytics.

In North America we experience the highest rate of drug related mortality in the world. In the US, overdose is now the leading cause of death among adults under 50. Each day more than 115 people in the United States die due to an opioid overdose. The opioid overdose national crisis is rapidly evolving due to changes in drug availability and the presence of adulterated fentanyl in some areas leading to a critical need for innovative methods to identify opioid overdoses for both surveillance and intervention purposes.

June 18, 2019

Enhancing TX SyS by integrating EMS and Poison Data for Opioid Overdose Surveillance

In recent years, the number of deaths from illicit and prescription opioids has increased significantly resulting in a national and local public health crisis. According to the Texas Center for Health Statistics, there were 1340 opioid related deaths in 2015.1 In 2005, by comparison, there were 913 opioid related deaths. Syndromic surveillance can be used to monitor overdose trends in near real-time and provide much needed information to public health officials.

June 18, 2019

Approach to Onboarding Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Data Into a Syndromic Surveillance System

Syndromic surveillance has become an integral component of public health surveillance efforts within the state of Florida. The near real-time nature of these data are critical during events such as the Zika virus outbreak in Florida in 2016 and in the aftermath of Hurricane Irma in 2017. Additionally, syndromic surveillance data are utilized to support daily reportable disease detection and other surveillance efforts.

June 18, 2019

An Assessment of the EMS Drug Overdose to Death Pathway from 2011 to 2017

Drug overdoses are now the leading cause of accidental death in the United States, with an estimated 60,000 deaths in 2016. Nationally, EMS overdose responses with naloxone administration have nearly doubled from 2012 to 2016 from 573.6 to 1004.4 per 100,000 EMS events. Resuscitation using the opioid antagonist, naloxone is recommended in cases of suspected opioid ODs, and has been increasingly used by EMS agencies, law enforcement, healthcare providers, and Good Samaritans.

June 18, 2019

Optimization of Linkage between North Carolina EMS and ED Data: EMS Naloxone Cases

The opioid overdose crisis has rapidly expanded in North Carolina (NC), paralleling the epidemic across the United States. The number of opioid overdose deaths in NC has increased by nearly 40% each year since 2015.1 Critical to preventing overdose deaths is increasing access to the life-saving drug naloxone, which can reverse overdose symptoms and progression.

June 18, 2019

Assessment of a Surveillance Case Definition for Heroin Overdose in Emergency Medical Services Data

In 2016, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention funded 12 states, under the Enhanced State Opioid Overdose Surveillance (ESOOS) program, to utilize state Emergency Medical Services (EMS) and emergency department (ED) syndromic surveillance (SyS) data systems to increase timeliness of state data on drug overdoses. A key aspect of the ESOOS program is the development and validation of case definitions for drug overdoses for EMS and ED SyS data systems.

January 25, 2018

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