Evaluation of Syndromic Surveillance for Opioid Overdose Reporting in Illinois

Accuracy in identifying drug-related emergency department admissions is critical to understanding local burden of disease and assessing effectiveness of drug abuse prevention and overdose-reduction initiatives. In 2018 the Illinois Department of Public Health (IDPH) began implementation of a mandatory opioid overdose reporting law, applicable to all hospital emergency departments (ED). The mandate requires reporting of patient demographics, causal substance and antagonist ED administration within 48 hours of presentation. This reporting is not name-based.

June 18, 2019

Finding Chances to Intervene Before the Fatal Overdose: Linking ED and Mortality Data

In 2017, 951 Missouri residents died from an opioid overdose, a record number for the state.1 This continues the trend from 2016, which saw an increase of over 30% in opioid overdose deaths compared to 2015. The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services (MDHSS) manages several public health surveillance data sources that can be used to inform about the opioid epidemic. Opioid overdose deaths are identified through death certificates which are collected through the vital records system.

June 18, 2019

Flexibility of ED surveillance system to monitor dengue outbreak in Reunion Island

In Reunion Island, a French overseas territory located in the southwestern of Indian Ocean, the dengue virus circulation is sporadic. Since 2004, between 10 and 221 probable and confirmed autochthonous dengue fever cases have been reported annually. Since January 2018, the island has experienced a large epidemic of DENV serotype 2. As of 4 September 2018, 6,538 confirmed and probable autochthonous cases have been notified1.

June 18, 2019

Forecasting hospital pneumonia admissions using influenza surveillance, climate and community data

Influenza peaks around June and December in Singapore every year. Facing an ageing population, hospitals in Singapore have been constantly reaching maximum bed occupancy. The ability to be able to make early decisions during peak periods is important. Tan Tock Seng Hospital is the second largest adult acute care general hospital in Singapore. Pneumonia-related emergency department (ED) admissions are a huge burden to the hospital's resources. The number of cases vary year on year as it depends on seasonal vaccine effectiveness and the population's immunity to the circulating strain.

June 18, 2019

Identification and Assessment of Repeat Drug Overdose Visits at EDs in Virginia

The Virginia Department of Health (VDH) utilizes syndromic surveillance ED data to measure morbidity associated with opioid and heroin overdoses among Virginia residents. Understanding which individuals within a population use ED services for repeated drug overdose events may help guide the use of limited resources towards the most effective treatment and prevention efforts.

June 18, 2019

Identifying Emergency Department Care in the Year Prior to Suicide Death

Suicide is a leading cause of mortality in the United States, causing about 45,000 deaths annually. Research suggests that universal screening in health care settings may be beneficial for prevention, but few studies have combined detailed suicide circumstances with ED encounter data to better understand care-seeking behavior prior to death.

Objective: To identify potential emergency department (ED) visits prior to suicide deaths in North Carolina (NC) and describe pre-suicide care-seeking in EDs.

June 18, 2019

Monitoring Sexual Violence Visits in Emergency Department Data to Improve Public Health

Although sexual violence is a pressing public health and safety issue, it has historically been challenging to monitor population trends with precision. Approximately 31% of incidents of sexual violence are reported to law enforcement and only 5% lead to an arrest1, making the use of law enforcement data challenging. Syndromic surveillance data from emergency departments provides an opportunity to use care-seeking to more accurately surveil sexual violence without introducing additional burdens on either patients or healthcare providers.

June 18, 2019

Analysis of Emergency Department Visits for Motor Vehicle Injuries in Utah, 2016

Motor vehicle injury is the leading cause of death in injury category in the United States. In 2016, motor vehicle crashes were one of the main causes of death resulting from injury (8.8 per 100,000 population) in Utah. Motor vehicle crashes can lead to physical and economic consequences that impact the lives of individuals and their families. In addition, the treatment of injuries places an enormous burden on hospital Emergency Departments (EDs).

June 18, 2019

Multidimensional Semantic Scan for Pre-Syndromic Disease Surveillance

An interdisciplinary team convened by ISDS to translate public health use-case needs into well-defined technical problems recently identified the need for new pre-syndromic surveillance methods that do not rely on existing syndromes or pre-defined illness categories1.

June 18, 2019

Asthma vs. PM2.5: A Bridge Between Health and Environmental Surveillance.

Southwest states are prone to wildfires, dust storms, and high winds especially during the monsoon season (June- September). Wildfire smoke is a complex mixture of carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, water vapor, hydrocarbons, nitrogen, oxides, metals, and particulate matter (PM). Dust storms are made up of aerosols and dust particles varying in size; particles bigger than 10 µm are not breathable, but can damage external organs such as causing skin and eye irritations.

June 18, 2019

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