Public Health Surveillance for the Great American Solar Eclipse in Oregon

The Great American Solar Eclipse of 2017 provided a rare opportunity to view a complete solar eclipse on the American mainland. Much of Oregon was in the path of totality and forecasted to have clear skies. Ahead of the event, OPHD aggregated a list of 107 known gatherings in mostly rural areas across the state, some with estimated attendance of up to 30,000 attendees. Temporary food vendors and a range of sanitation solutions (including open latrines) were planned. International travelers were expected, along with large numbers of visitors traveling by car on the day of the eclipse.

January 25, 2018

ED and poison center surveillance for the Great American Solar Eclipse in Oregon

Oregon’s statewide syndromic surveillance system (Oregon ESSENCE) has been operational since 2012. Non-federal emergency department data (and several of their associated urgent care centers) are the primary source for the system, although other data sources have been added, including de-identified call data from OPC in 2016. OPHD epidemiologists have experience monitoring mass gatherings and have a strong relationship with OPC, collaborating on a regular basis for routine and heightened public health surveillance.

January 25, 2018

Data Sharing Among Three States in the BioSense Platform during the 2017 US Solar Eclipse

In 2016, the BioSense Platform for national syndromic surveillance made substantial enhancements including data processing changes, a national ESSENCE instance, and management tools to support diverse data sharing needs. On August 21, 2017, a total solar eclipse occurred over much of the United States. The event resulted in large gatherings over multiple days to areas in the Path of Totality (PoT). In the days leading up to the event, public health and emergency preparedness included syndromic surveillance in their monitoring plans.

January 25, 2018

Oregon Poison Center and Oregon Public Health Division Monitoring for the 2017 Solar Eclipse

Presented November 31, 2017 by the Oregon Poison Center and Oregon Public Health Division Monitoring.

Presenters:

Sandy Giffin, RN, MS, Director, Oregon Poison Center

Laurel Boyd, MPH, ESSENCE Epidemiologist, Oregon Public Health Division

December 01, 2017

Oregon Short Surveillance Report Template

This one-page report template is provided by the Oregon Public Health Division Health Intelligence Branch and will adapted for statewide surveillance of the 2017 Solar Eclipse.

 

August 17, 2017

Oregon ESSENCE: Using ESSENCE for Mass Gathering Surveillance

Syndromic surveillance is the near real-time monitoring of key health indicators in emergency department (ED) and urgent care visits. Oregon ESSENCE tracks the number of visits for specific patient symptoms using chief complaints (what the patient says is the reason for their visit) and discharge diagnosis codes. Visit information is collected from EDs and urgent care centers across the state. Currently, all 60 eligible hospitals are sending ED data every day for syndromic surveillance. Some urgent care centers are currently reporting. See

August 16, 2017

How Oregon Tested its Mass Gathering Protocol and Mobilized Communities

Mass gatherings (e.g., concerts, festivals, sporting events, political rallies, and religious gatherings) pose unique challenges to public health officials. Risks associated with large events can vary and are influenced by factors such as crowd size and age (range, or average/mean), weather, event type and purpose, and use of alcohol or drugs. Often, the risk of injury increases. And not only do people in large crowds spread disease through close contact during an event, they can transport the disease when they leave. Healthcare resources can therefore be overwhelmed.

February 27, 2018

Contact Us

NSSP Community of Practice

Email: syndromic@cste.org

 

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