Enterovirus D68 Outbreak SyS Discussion

ISDS Conference Call to discuss surveillance for severe respiratory illness / Enterovirus D68. This call will be an opportunity for syndromic surveillance practitioners to share their experiences conducting their contribution to surveillance for Enterovirus D68.

July 24, 2017

Using Emergency Department Data for Detection of a Synthetic Marijuana Outbreak

Timely access to Emergency Department (ED) Chief Complaint (CC) data, before the definitive diagnosis is established, allows for early outbreak detection and prompt response by public health officials.BioSense 2.0 is a cloud-based application that securely collects, tracks, and shares ED data from participating hospitals around the country. Denver Health (DH) is one of several Colorado hospitals contributing ED Chief Complaint data to BioSense 2.0. In August 2013, ED clinicians reported an increase in patients presenting with excited delirium, possibly related to synthetic marijuana (SM).

December 20, 2017

Regional Syndromic Surveillance Data Sharing Workshop: HHS Region 10

The HHS Region 10 workshop engaged nine participants from state and local public health departments in Idaho, Oregon, and Washington with experience in syndromic surveillance that ranged from less than 1 year to over 10 years. Representatives from Alaska, which is also in HHS Region 10, were unable to participate. Because the participants did not have access to actual emergency department (ED) syndromic surveillance data for sharing, the focus of the workshop was on building inter- jurisdictional understanding and sharing of practices.

Learning Objectives

March 14, 2017

Arizona Syndromic Surveillance Implementation Guide for Critical Access Hospitals and Eligible Hospitals

This guide offers standardized specifications to Eligible Hospitals (EHs) and Critical Access Hospitals (CAHs) for the electronic transfer of Syndromic Surveillance (SS) data from hospital Certified Electronic Health Records technology (CEHRT) to the BioSense 2.0 system for SS reporting. This guide will provide an overview of the type of data being collected, the suppliers of the data, the system collecting the information, and the format needed for successful submission of Syndromic Surveillance data to ADHS.

October 13, 2017

Automating BioSense 2.0 Locker Processing for Local Program-Specific Surveillance

Syndromic surveillance can provide early warning of potential public health emergencies and acute health events in a population. The sharing and aggregation of syndromic data among jurisdictions can provide more comprehensive situational awareness and improve coordination and decision-making. The BioSense 2.0 Program supports increased syndromic data-sharing among a nationwide network of local and state public health agencies. Most users of this application utilize the main web site front-door interface due to its user-friendly features for query and analysis.

August 22, 2018

Comparison of Aberration Detection Algorithms for Biosurveillance Systems

Use of robust and broadly applicable statistical alerting methods is essential for a public health Biosurveillance system. We compared several algorithms related to the Early Aberration Reporting System C2 (adaptive control chart) method for practical detection sensitivity and timeliness using a realistic but stochastic signal inject strategy with a variety of data streams. The comparison allowed detail examination of strategies for adjusting daily syndromic counts for day-of-week effects and the total daily volume of facility visits.

August 22, 2018

Check! Explore Barriers and Solutions to Data Sharing on BioSense 2.0

Inter-jurisdictional data sharing can enhance disease surveillance capabilities for local, state, regional and national public health situational awareness and response. BioSense 2.0, a cloud-based computing platform for syndromic surveillance, provides participating local, state and federal health jurisdictions with the ability to share aggregated data; a functionality that is easily activated by selecting an administrative checkbox within the BioSense application. Checking the data-sharing box, however, is a considerable decision that comes with benefits and consequences.

August 22, 2018

Check! Explore barriers and solutions to data sharing to BioSense 2.0

The benefits of inter-jurisdictional data sharing have been touted as a hallmark of BioSense 2.0, a cloud-based computing platform for syndromic surveillance. A key feature of the BioSense 2.0 platform is the ability to share data across jurisdictions with a standardized interface. Jurisdictions can easily share their data with others by selecting data sharing partners from a list of participating jurisdictions.

October 31, 2017

BioSense 2.0 Governance: Surveying Users and Stakeholders for Continued Development

The CDC's BioSense 2.0 system is designed with a user-centered approach, where the needs and requests of the users are part of its continued development. User requirements were gathered extensively to help design BioSense 2.0 and users continue to submit feedback which is used to make improvements to the system. However, in order to ensure that these needs are gathered in a formal and ongoing way, the BioSense 2.0 Governance Group, comprised primarily of state and local public health representatives, was established to advise the CDC on the development of BioSense 2.0.

August 22, 2018

Visualization in R

The topics covered in this training include frequency tables, scatter plots, correlation plots, box plots, panels with multiple plots on the same page, formatting/customizing plots, and lattice and ggplot2 packages for elegant visualization.

October 31, 2017

Pages

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NSSP Community of Practice

Email: syndromic@cste.org

 

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