Sensitivity and Specificity of the Fever Syndromes in BioSense and ESSENCE

Syndromic surveillance refers to the monitoring of disease related events, sets of clinical features (i.e. syndromes), or other indicators in a population. Tennessee obtains emergency department data for syndromic surveillance in standardized HL7 format following the field and value set standards published by the Public Health Information Network. Messages contain information previously unavailable to syndromic surveillance systems, including quantitative values such as recorded temperature.

September 08, 2017

Towards Self Validation: Progress and Roadmap for Automating the Validation of BioSense Partner Facilities

One of the greatest hurdles for BioSense Onboarding is the process of validating data received to ensure it contains Data Elements of Interest (DEOI) needed for syndromic surveillance. Efforts to automate this process are critical to meet existing and future demands for facility onboarding requests as well as provide a foundation for data quality assurance efforts. By automating the validation process, BioSense hopes to:

1. Reduce costs associated with the iterative validation process.

2. Improve BioSense response times for assistance with onboarding.

September 19, 2017

Update on the CDC National Syndromic Surveillance Program

The Public Health Security and Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response Act of 2002 mandated establishing an integrated national public health surveillance system for early detection and rapid assessment of potential bioterrorism-related illness. In 2003, CDC created and launched the BioSense software program. At that time, CDC’s focus was on rapidly developing and implementing Web-based software to collect hospital emergency department data for analysis to detect and monitor syndromes of public health importance.

September 20, 2017

KS Onboarding Presentation

These slides provide an overview of the onboarding process for jurisdictions in Kansas supplying data for BioSense. This presentation emphasizes steps needed to improve data quality.

October 29, 2017

National Syndromic Surveillance Program (NSSP) BioSense Data Sharing Workgroup - Report

This report summarizes a series of Data Sharing Workgroups that occurred in 2014 and 2015.

Purpose of the workgroups: To provide community input on topics related to data sharing functionalities in the BioSense platform.

October 29, 2017

National Syndromic Surveillance Program (NSSP) BioSense Onboarding Workgroup - Report

Objective

To share best practices for onboarding amongst community members in the interest of improving onboarding efforts nationally.

October 29, 2017

National Syndromic Surveillance Program (NSSP) BioSense Syndrome Definitions Workgroup - Report

This report summarizes a series of seven meetings of the Syndrome Definition Workgroup held in 2014 and 2015.

Objective

To review, validate, and modify syndromes and provide community input on a process to update or develop syndromes.

October 29, 2017

TN Onboarding Presentation

These slides summarize the process in Tennessee for onboarding hospitals' syndromic surveillance data into BioSense.

October 29, 2017

AZ Onboarding Presentation

This presentation walks the Arizona health departments through the process of onboarding and references available documentation to assist in the process.

October 23, 2017

North Dakota Syndromic Surveillance Program Overview: Onboarding

From the BioSense 2.0 Onboarding Workgroup Meeting, March 4, 2015

Presenter

Jill K Baber, MPH
Influenza and Syndromic Surveillance Coordinator
North Dakota Department of Health
Division of Disease Control

March 15, 2017

Pages

Contact Us

NSSP Community of Practice

Email: syndromic@cste.org

 

This website is supported by Cooperative Agreement # 6NU38OT000297-02-01 Strengthening Public Health Systems and Services through National Partnerships to Improve and Protect the Nation's Health between the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists. Its contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of CDC. CDC is not responsible for Section 508 compliance (accessibility) on private websites.

Site created by Fusani Applications